Posts Tagged ‘Royal Nonesuch Gallery’

Step of Two at Royal Nonesuch Gallery

Right: Henna Vainio, Legs (orange), 2017; plaster, pigment, fiberglass, steel; 78 x 8 x 8 in. Left: Emily Mast. ENDE (Like a New Beginning), 2014 (video still); HD color video with sound; 7:30 sec. Courtesy of Royal Nonesuch Gallery. Photo: Dana Hemenway.

Step of Two, the current exhibition by Emily Mast and Henna Vainio at Royal Nonesuch, tenderly complicates ideas of action versus inaction. Two freestanding sculptures by Vainio have an immediate presence, with bright colors and abstract forms that suggest human postures. To make them, Vainio pours pigmented plaster into corrugated-cardboard cylindrical molds, which collapse and bend under the weight of the plaster. Once set, the plaster[…..]

Talking About 100 Days Action, Part 1

Jenifer K Wofford. No Scrubs, 2017; participatory action, performed on January 21, 2017, at the Women's Marches in San Francisco and Oakland, as part of 100 Days Action. Courtesy of 100.

On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump reached the nation’s highest political office after a long and brutal election cycle. In response, artists throughout the United States mobilized to resist regressive policy changes that would set progressive efforts back by at least fifty years. Writer and activist Ingrid Rojas Contreras collaborated with numerous Bay Area artists to form 100 Days Action, a creative affiliation described as[…..]

Tapping the Mirror at Royal NoneSuch Gallery

Brynda Glazier and Courtney Johnson. Tapping the Mirror, 2015. Installation view. Courtesy of the artists and Royal Nonesuch Gallery, Oakland. Photo Courtney Johnson

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Sarah Burke’s review of Tapping the Mirror at Royal NoneSuch Gallery in Oakland, California. The author notes, “As the fragments [of the video] continuously flicker into each other, [it] becomes less about the worlds imagined, and more about the modes by which we collectively imagine them.” This article was originally published on August 6, 2015. The curatorial statement for[…..]