Posts Tagged ‘Kara Q. Smith’

Keith Haring: The Political Line at the de Young Museum

Keith Haring. A Pile of Crowns for Jean-Michel Basquiat, 1988; acrylic on canvas; 120 x 120 x 120 in. Courtesy of de Young Museum San Francisco. Collection of the Keith Haring Foundation. © 2014, Keith Haring Foundation.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Kara Q. Smith’s review of Keith Haring: The Political Line at the de Young Museum in San Francisco. Smith notes that the exhibition “…offers the chance not only to appreciate the artist’s work and iconic imagery from multiple perspectives (albeit sometimes dizzying at this scale), but most importantly the chance to bring new context to the work.”[…..]

Best of 2014 – Shotgun Reviews: From Two Arises Three at the Asian Art Museum

Michael Cherney and Arnold Chang. After Huang Gongwong 4, 2009 (detail); photographic inkjet print and ink on paper. From the collection of Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang. Courtesy of the Artist and Asian Art Museum. Photo: Jing Cao.

As we continue our look back over the year, today’s Best of 2014 selection comes from Kara Q. Smith, who writes, “Shotgun Reviews are one of my favorite ways to hear about exhibitions from near and far. They are a way for those who aren’t regular contributors to Art Practical and Daily Serving to publish with us. Jing’s review lucidly weaves descriptions with analysis, allowing[…..]

Best of 2014 – Self-Taught Genius at the American Folk Art Museum

Purvis Young. People Celebrating, 1990s. Mixed Media on wood; 49 x 34 1⁄2 x 5”. Collection American Folk Art Museum, New York. Gift of Gordon W. Bailey in honor of Anne Imelda Radice. Photo by Adam Reich, New York.

As we continue our look back over the year, today’s Best of 2014 selection comes from Kara Q. Smith, the managing editor of our partner site Art Practical. Kara writes, “Lia Wilson’s review of Self Taught Genius gives attention to an oft-overlooked, or mis-represented, area of contemporary art (not to mention venue). Lia engages directly with the larger contexts surrounding not only the art, but the exhibition[…..]