Posts Tagged ‘Odd Jobs’

Happy New Year!

2016 was an exceptional year for Daily Serving! We celebrated our tenth anniversary and Michele Carlson became our new executive director. We inaugurated “Odd Jobs,” a new interviews column regarding art and labor, and covered major art-world stories like Pedro Reyes’ Doomocracy and Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947–2016, at Hauser Wirth & Schimmel. Of course, we also turned an assessing eye to exhibitions in cities such as Birmingham, Dhaka, Nashville, Mexico City,[…..]

Odd Jobs: Charles Gaines

Charles Gaines. Numbers and Trees V. Landscape #8: Orange Crow, 1978; acrylic sheet, acrylic paint, watercolor, photograph. 46 5⁄8 × 38 5⁄8 in. Courtesy the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer.

For the past forty years, Charles Gaines has employed system-based methodologies to his artmaking in order to critique subjective expression within art. Influenced by Tantric Buddhist diagrams in the late 1960s, his photographs, drawings, and works on paper investigate how rule-based procedures construct order and meaning. Gaines is also a highly regarded educator at the California Institute of the Arts. He received his MFA from the Rochester[…..]

Odd Jobs: Kalup Linzy

Kalup Linzy. Romantic Loner. 2013 (still); video; 73:00. Courtesy of the artist.

Welcome to the second issue of “Odd Jobs,” in which we explore the many jobs artists hold in order to support their art practice. I spoke with Kalup Linzy, a New York–based performance and video artist famous for his soap opera–style video works, such as a piece produced for the Studio Museum in Harlem titled All My Churen. Linzy uses low-tech productions methods and often[…..]

Odd Jobs: Jibz Cameron/Dynasty Handbag

Dynasty Handbag. Remote Penetration / Stain of History, 2013 (still); video; 7:29. Courtesy of the artist.

Welcome to the first issue of “Odd Jobs,” in which we explore artists’ day jobs. Many artists have held very odd jobs in order to support their art practice, and more often than not these jobs go unspoken and yet end up informing their work. Today we chat with Jibz Cameron, a Los Angeles-based performance and video artist who performs as her alter ego, Dynasty[…..]