Maria Porges

From this Author

Visual Art and the American Experience at the African American Museum of History and Culture

Visual Art and the American Experience, Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of African American History and Culture Architectural Photrography

In the art world, we don’t talk often enough about the ways in which class defines museums—in particular, art museums—in that their contents are largely formed by the tastes and investments of the rich. There is no other conceivable explanation for the way institutions continue to represent the nation’s art largely as the work of individuals who are White and male. It is in this[…..]

A Matter of Fact: Toyin Ojih Odutola at Museum of the African Diaspora

Toyin Ojih Odutola. The Marchioness, 2016; charcoal, pastel, and pencil on paper; 77 x 50 inches (paper), 83 3/8 x 65 7/8 x 2 inches (framed). Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

In A Matter of Fact at San Francisco’s Museum of the African Diaspora, Toyin Ojih Odutola presents an elaborately conceived and completely imaginary history of the UmuEze Amara clan, as chronicled in a series of portrait drawings in pastel, charcoal, and pencil. A wall text in the main gallery states that these works were selected from the family’s extensive holdings of art and antiquities by[…..]

Gerardo Tan: Hablon Redux and Other Transcriptions at Random Parts

Gerardo Tan. Turntable Paintings, 2016; vinyl, acrylic; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Random Parts. Photo: Maria Porges.

What does it mean to transcribe a work from one medium to another? Is the result a kind of translation, a form of documentation, a new piece of art, or all three? In a fascinating range of media—painting, video, found objects, weaving, and sound—Manila-based artist Gerardo Tan investigates these questions through three different projects presented in his solo exhibition Hablon Redux and Other Transcriptions at[…..]