Calder Yates

From this Author

Odd Jobs: Danielle Dean

Danielle Dean. Hexafluorosilicic, 2015; installation view at Commonwealth & Council, Los Angeles. Courtesy of the artist.

Welcome back to Odd Jobs, where artists talk about their varied and nontraditional career arcs. For this installment, I spoke to Danielle Dean—born to a Nigerian father and an English mother in Alabama—whose interdisciplinary practice draws from this multinational background. Her work explores the interpellation of thoughts, feelings, and social relations by power structures working through news, advertising, political speech, and digital media. She has[…..]

Odd Jobs: Charles Gaines

Charles Gaines. Numbers and Trees V. Landscape #8: Orange Crow, 1978; acrylic sheet, acrylic paint, watercolor, photograph. 46 5⁄8 × 38 5⁄8 in. Courtesy the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer.

For the past forty years, Charles Gaines has employed system-based methodologies to his artmaking in order to critique subjective expression within art. Influenced by Tantric Buddhist diagrams in the late 1960s, his photographs, drawings, and works on paper investigate how rule-based procedures construct order and meaning. Gaines is also a highly regarded educator at the California Institute of the Arts. He received his MFA from the Rochester[…..]

Odd Jobs: Kalup Linzy

Kalup Linzy. Romantic Loner. 2013 (still); video; 73:00. Courtesy of the artist.

Welcome to the second issue of “Odd Jobs,” in which we explore the many jobs artists hold in order to support their art practice. I spoke with Kalup Linzy, a New York–based performance and video artist famous for his soap opera–style video works, such as a piece produced for the Studio Museum in Harlem titled All My Churen. Linzy uses low-tech productions methods and often[…..]

Odd Jobs: Jibz Cameron/Dynasty Handbag

Dynasty Handbag. Remote Penetration / Stain of History, 2013 (still); video; 7:29. Courtesy of the artist.

Welcome to the first issue of “Odd Jobs,” in which we explore artists’ day jobs. Many artists have held very odd jobs in order to support their art practice, and more often than not these jobs go unspoken and yet end up informing their work. Today we chat with Jibz Cameron, a Los Angeles-based performance and video artist who performs as her alter ego, Dynasty[…..]

Flavr Savr* at the Pit

Lynn Hershman Leeson. GMO Animals, Crops, Labs (The Infinity Engine), 2014; wallpaper; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and the Pit.

The Pit, a small artist-run gallery, sits semi-hidden in a commercial and industrial neighborhood north of Los Angeles. Artists Devon Oder and Adam Miller founded the gallery in 2014, exhibiting emerging artists in tightly curated group shows alongside at least one well-established artist. The Pit, located in a converted car mechanic’s garage, has the same anonymously beige exterior as the neighboring businesses. But its out-of-the-way[…..]

Carmen Argote: Mansión Magnolia at Shulamit Nazarian

Carmen Argote. Black Chairs, 2016; archival inkjet print; 58 x 80 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Shulamit Nazarian.

Expressions of both individual psychology and grand family histories are easily found in the architecture of a past home. These two narratives are counterintuitive yet closely related. When a family invests in a house, apartment, or some shared space, its interiors, like one’s mind, can feel simultaneously claustrophobic and inexhaustibly complex, and revisiting a former home can bring up fraught confrontations with descendants and sentimentality.[…..]

Kasper Bosmans: Motif (Oil and Silver) at Marc Foxx

Kasper Bosmans. Columna Rostrata, 2016; 1914 print, wood plexiglass, chain; 48 x 5 x 2 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Marc Foxx Gallery.

Up-and-coming Belgian artist Kasper Bosmans continues his interest in symbology with Motif (Oil and Silver) at Marc Foxx. His paintings and sculptures investigate rostral columns, whales, Roman shipping vessels, coinage, and Coco Chanel, among other seemingly unconnected imagery. About a dozen works, tastefully arranged, point to linkages both literal and figurative. The first series of paintings, Coco, Chain (She Loves Pink, Juicy Details, Guava Jelly,[…..]