Posts Tagged ‘Taylor Renee’

Spotlight: ARTS.BLACK

Kerry James Marshall. Installation view, Mastry at MOCA Grand Avenue. Courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Forrest.

This summer, Daily Serving is highlighting work from a few arts publications that we love, and this week we’re focused on ARTS.BLACK. Reflecting on Kareem Reid’s article, co-editors Taylor Renee and Jessica Lynne write, “This essay remains a cornerstone for ARTS.BLACK. Commissioned as one of the two essays for the launch of the journal, Kareem’s essay poignantly articulates our mission and the importance of publishing young Black critics.” This article was originally[…..]

Spotlight: ARTS.BLACK

Artist Kosi Nnebe.

This summer, Daily Serving is shining a light on some of the many arts publications that we regularly read, and this week we’re devoting our attention to ARTS.BLACK. Co-editors Taylor Renee and Jessica Lynne write, “It was a pleasure to publish this insightful interview with Kosi Nnebe, an emerging visual artist from Montreal. You might read this interview and be tempted to think that Stephanye Watts and Kosi[…..]

Spotlight: ARTS.BLACK

FAKA (Thato and Desire), photo courtesy of Elle South Africa

This summer, Daily Serving is shining a light on some of the many arts publications that we admire, and this week we’re devoting our attention to ARTS.BLACK. Of today’s selection, co-editors Taylor Renee and Jessica Lynne write, “A beautiful, poetic, and intimate epistle dedicated to Marlon Riggs, this is a text that must be read over and over again.” Serubiri Moses’ letter was originally published on August 5,[…..]

Spotlight: ARTS.BLACK

HouseFull at Regina’s Door, “We Are Staying Right Here,” Photo: Robbie Sweeny Photography

This summer, Daily Serving is shining a light on some of the many arts publications that we respect, and this week we’re devoting our attention to ARTS.BLACK. “Loud.Black.Resident III” is the first selection from co-editors Taylor Renee and Jessica Lynne: “In 2016, we commissioned our first interview series focused on performance from Arielle Julia Brown, theater artist and performance curator. This conversation with Amara Tabor Smith invokes the[…..]