Posts Tagged ‘Sculpture’

Spotlight: Chicago Artist Writers

Dan Graham, Pavilion/Sculpture for Argonne (detail), 1982; Photograph by the writer, 2015

This summer, Daily Serving is shining a light on some of the commendable arts publications that we regularly read, and this week we’re spending some time with Chicago Artist Writers. In “The Geese at Argonne: On Dan Graham’s Pavilion/Sculpture for Argonne,” artist and writer Yuri Stone discusses a road trip to visit a forgotten Dan Graham sculpture on the campus of the Argonne National Laboratory outside of[…..]

Step of Two at Royal Nonesuch Gallery

Right: Henna Vainio, Legs (orange), 2017; plaster, pigment, fiberglass, steel; 78 x 8 x 8 in. Left: Emily Mast. ENDE (Like a New Beginning), 2014 (video still); HD color video with sound; 7:30 sec. Courtesy of Royal Nonesuch Gallery. Photo: Dana Hemenway.

Step of Two, the current exhibition by Emily Mast and Henna Vainio at Royal Nonesuch, tenderly complicates ideas of action versus inaction. Two freestanding sculptures by Vainio have an immediate presence, with bright colors and abstract forms that suggest human postures. To make them, Vainio pours pigmented plaster into corrugated-cardboard cylindrical molds, which collapse and bend under the weight of the plaster. Once set, the plaster[…..]

Beyond the Canvas: Contemporary Art from Puerto Rico at Newcomb Museum

Elsa María Meléndez, El Ingenio Colectivo o la Maldición de la Cotorra, 2014;
Installation view, Beyond the Canvas, 2017. Courtesy of Newcomb Museum.

Ni de aqui, ni de alla—neither from here or there. This is something you might hear on the streets of Puerto Rico as people consider what it means to be both citizens of the United States and colonized subjects of an antiquated political system. This year, Puerto Rico had the largest bankruptcy case in the history of the American market. The island’s total debt, according[…..]

Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian: Lineages

Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian. Fourth Family: Decagon, 2013; Installation view, mirror, oil painting behind glass and PVC; 48 x 48 x 12 inches. Courtesy of the SCAD Museum of Art. Photo: John McKinnon.

In a darkened hallway between two galleries in the Savannah College of Art and Design Museum of Art are several brightly lit works by Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian. In this solo exhibition, titled Lineages, a series of Farmanfarmaian’s elaborate mirror sculptures are installed across from a number of her intricate geometric drawings, revealing an astute conflation of Western abstraction and traditional folk art of her native[…..]

Fan Mail: Molly Dierks

Molly Dierks. Hardbodies, 2012; wood, automotive paint, lathed aluminum, mirrors; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

In her work, Molly Dierks forces together concepts of normative femininity and elements of industrial fabrication—sometimes uneasily, other times uncannily well. Using saturated and pastel hues typically associated with women’s products in combination with hard metals and unyielding forms, Dierks makes associations between femininity and fabrication that describe complicity rather than contrasts. Her sculptures do more than point out the labor intrinsic to the production[…..]

Derrick Adams: Network at CAAM

Derrick Adams. Fabrication Station #8, 2016; mixed fabric collage, aluminum hanging rods; 6 x 9 ft. Courtesy of the California African American Museum. Photo: Andy Romer.

Recently many have observed that current American film and television scenarios feel familiar, with offerings that appear diverse and multicultural, as they would have seemed in earlier decades. This is not to say that the struggles of marginalized communities have been overcome; just because a person is visible does not mean that person is liberated. However, media representations can illustrate experiences outside of dominant cultural[…..]

Fan Mail: Brian Cooper

Brian Cooper. Gratification Management, 2004 (detail); upholstery, synthetic stuffing, staples, zip ties, chicken wire, covered buttons, metal buckets, carpet, wood paneling; 15 x 30 x 2 feet. Courtesy of the Artist.

There is something quite sordid about Brian Cooper’s sculptural installations. The tufted forms in sickly mustard yellows and dark browns seem to ooze over walls, drip down plinths, and pool on aging carpets. As heavy, spreading masses and playful renditions on the theme of corporeality, they are like tactile manifestations of the slow, creeping wave of nausea that comes when one has overstayed an afterparty.[…..]