Posts Tagged ‘Rina Banerjee’

Rina Banerjee: Human Likeness at Hosfelt Gallery

Rina Banerjee. Heavens no place for girls, no sand, no flowers no count of curls no irons to flatten nor straighten or curl you coiled corns, your hair would not leave you naked as girls when all but one could leave open my calls to trumpet her thoughts, stainless steel bikini and sanding wheels for girls who will not open, 2016; blue silver leaf, acrylic, aluminum leaf, and ink on paper; 66 x 30 inches. Courtesy of Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Maddie Klett reviews Rina Banerjee: Human Likeness at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco. Indian artist Rina Banerjee titles her bold paintings and[…..]

#Hashtags: On Disgust

Rina Banerjee. She was now in western style dress covered in part of Empires' ruffle and red dress, had a foreign and peculiar race, a Ganesha who had lost her head, was thrown across sea until herself shipwrecked. A native of Bangladesh lost foot to root in Videsh, followed her mother full stop on forehead, trapped tongue of horn and grew ram-like under stress, 2011. Cowrie shells, rooster feather, gourds, acrylic horns, ceramic balls, plastic netting, amber glass vials, violet glass bulbs, false glass doe eyeballs, silk and synthetic Lanvin ruffled red dress. 73 x 65 in. dia. (185.4 x 165.1 cm).
Copyright Rina Banerjee. Courtesy L.A. Louver, Venice, CA.

#other #violence #misogyny #racism #Orientalism #hybridity An act of senseless violence at UC Santa Barbara this past week has reignited an online conversation about the interrelationship between race, gender, discrimination, and violence. While the tweets and subsequent articles around #yesallwomen have drawn public attention to the gendered assumptions that underpin violent behavior, less visibility has accrued to the role that Orientalism played in dehumanizing and[…..]