Posts Tagged ‘race’

Spotlight: Contemptorary

Image courtesy of Contemptorary.

Wrapping up our week with contemptorary, today we bring you Jared Sexton’s “critical overview of the conversations surrounding the 2017 Whitney Biennial.” Co-founders Eunsong Kim and Gelare Khoshgozaran note: “In ‘The Rage: Some Closing Comments on Open Casket,’ Sexton interrogates the complicated psycho-political motivations driving the often polarizing debate concerning artists and their objects, and offers questions that refuse to simplify or foreclose this difficult discourse.” This[…..]

Spotlight: Contemptorary

Image courtesy of Contemptorary.

This week we’re highlighting the work of our friends at contemptorary, and today Gelare Khoshgozaran’s “Dear Colleagues: Dead or Alive” takes up the arts community, drawing necessary parallels between art and political movements. How have we spoken to each other? How will we continue speaking to each other? This essay was originally published on February 28, 2017. 1. Despite my disdain for predictability and repetitiveness, I[…..]

Spotlight: Contemptorary

Codex, 2017. courtesy of Mari Matsuda. Photo: Reese Kato.

This summer, Daily Serving is highlighting some publications that contribute to the global arts conversation. Today from contemptorary, co-founders Eunsong Kim and Gelare Khoshgozaran write, “Legal scholar and artist Mari Matsuda’s interview further extrapolates the power dynamics found in freedom and the arts. In ‘Mari Matsuda: Founding Critical Race Theorist, Activist and Artist,’ we discuss with Matsuda her thoughts on the intersections between law and expression, and the[…..]

Spotlight: Contemptorary

FEMelanin, Performance Stills from Bedtime Stories of White Supremacy, November 15, 2015 at Mana Contemporary, Chicago.

This summer, Daily Serving is shining a light on some arts publications that we admire, and this week we’re focusing our attention on contemptorary, a publication that has been running “on the desire to catapult and transform art conversations about power.” Co-founder Gelare Khoshgozaran writes, “With the ongoing debates surrounding the foundations and violences of ‘Freedom of Speech,’ we hope you read ‘The Freedom to Oppress’ by Eunsong[…..]

Interview with Hank Willis Thomas

Hank Willis Thomas. Question Bridge, 2013 at the Missouri History Museum.

Hank Willis Thomas has long illuminated the histories of racialized labor, Black cultural economies, politically crafted imagery, and their cumulative roads to revolution. His keen examinations of political gesture are steadily outgrowing their categorization as visual art and becoming increasingly discursive projects rooted in actualization. On the heels of his recent exhibition at Savannah College of Art and Design, Willis Thomas offers new avenues for[…..]

#Hashtags: The Painting

Installation view of Henry Taylor, The 4th, 2012-2017 and THE TIMES THAY AINT A

CHANGING, FAST ENOUGH!, 2017, with Deana Lawson, Ring Bearer, 2016. [Taylor]

Collection of the artist; courtesy Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo. [Lawson]

Collection of the artist; courtesy Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago, and Sikkema Jenkins &

Co., New York. Whitney Biennial 2017, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, March

17-June 11, 2017. Photo by Matthew Carasella.

#representation #WhitneyMuseum #EmmettTill #DanaSchutz #MartinBerger #race #civilrights So much hinges on the question of audience. Who is presumed to engage with artwork, and on what terms? In the museum, people of color so often feel that we are not the intended audience. The hurt that we experience on realizing that disconnect—that we are here for art but art is not necessarily here for us—has now been[…..]

Issues of Power: Resilience and Healing

Juan Roberto Diago. Aché Pa’ Los Míos [Good Vibes for My People], 1999, mixed media on burlap. Courtesy of The Cooper Gallery.

Today from our friends at Big Red & Shiny, we bring you a conversation between artist Chanel Thervil and artist and curator Silví Naçí. They discuss artist Juan Roberto Diago’s first retrospective, curated by Alejandro de la Fuente at the Cooper Gallery. Naci parallels the exploration of diasporic Africans in colonized Cuba in Diago’s work with the current political state of the U.S., saying, “…during a crucial moment in U.S.[…..]