Posts Tagged ‘Photography’

Louise Lawler: Why Pictures Now

Louise Lawler. Pollyanna (adjusted to fit), distorted for the times, 2007/2008/2012. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Metro Pictures, New York. © 2017 Louise Lawler.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Hoi Lun Helen Wong reviews Louise Lawler: Why Pictures Now at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Part of the[…..]

Richard Mosse: Incoming at the Barbican

Richard Mosse in collaboration with Trevor Tweeten and Ben Frost. Incoming, 2017; Installation view. The Curve, Barbican Centre, 15 Feb - 23 April 2017. Photo: Tristan Fewings / Getty images

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Eva Mak reviews Richard Mosse: Incoming at the Barbican in London. No matter race, age, origin, or legal status, while the human[…..]

Jeff Downer: Handsome Rewards

Jeff Downer. Handsome Rewards, 2017; Digital Print. Courtesy of Jeff Downer. Photo: Capture Photography Festival.

The artist ordered his friend an undying houseplant as a gift. To contextualize Handsome Rewards, Jeff Downer’s solo exhibition at Duplex, the artist shares this anecdote in his press release: “I found myself flipping through [a] merchandise catalogues…while walking it straight to the recycling bin. What caught my eye was something called a ‘resurrection plant.’ According to the ad, the plant can survive extreme dehydration[…..]

#Hashtags: The Painting

Installation view of Henry Taylor, The 4th, 2012-2017 and THE TIMES THAY AINT A

CHANGING, FAST ENOUGH!, 2017, with Deana Lawson, Ring Bearer, 2016. [Taylor]

Collection of the artist; courtesy Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo. [Lawson]

Collection of the artist; courtesy Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago, and Sikkema Jenkins &

Co., New York. Whitney Biennial 2017, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, March

17-June 11, 2017. Photo by Matthew Carasella.

#representation #WhitneyMuseum #EmmettTill #DanaSchutz #MartinBerger #race #civilrights So much hinges on the question of audience. Who is presumed to engage with artwork, and on what terms? In the museum, people of color so often feel that we are not the intended audience. The hurt that we experience on realizing that disconnect—that we are here for art but art is not necessarily here for us—has now been[…..]

Diane Arbus: In the Beginning at SFMOMA

Diane  Arbus. Female  impersonator  holding  long  gloves,  Hempstead,  L.I.,
1959. Courtesy  The Metropolitan  Museum  of Art. © The  Estate  of Diane  Arbus,  LLC.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Max Blue reviews Diane Arbus: In the Beginning at SFMOMA. Diane Arbus: In the Beginning is a meandering, somewhat maudlin journey through the[…..]

From Generation to Generation: Inherited Memory and Contemporary Art at the Contemporary Jewish Museum

From Generation to Generation: Inherited Memory and Contemporary Art, 2016; installation view, San Francisco, CA. Courtesy of the Contemporary Jewish Museum. Photo: JKA Photography.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Carlos Kong reviews From Generation to Generation: Inherited Memory and Contemporary Art at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco. Memories take[…..]

Takeshi Murata: 1000 Years

Takeshi Murata. Seahorse, 2017; pigment print; 29 x 40 inches. Courtesy of Ratio 3.

Computer-generated images saturate our media, from films to advertisements to video games. However, rarely do we think of these images singularly—most commonly we encounter them within the context of their media environments. In 1000 Years, Takeshi Murata’s fifth solo show at Ratio 3 gallery, the artist asks viewers to consider these images in isolation, outside of their complex digital environments. Murata uses 3D-modeling software to[…..]