Posts Tagged ‘Performance’

Latin American Circle Presents: An Evening of Performances

Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa. A Brief History of Architecture in Guatemala (Breve Historia de la Arquitec-tura en Guatemala), 2010; performance. Courtesy of the Guggenheim. Photos: Enid Alvarez © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 2017.

Fifty years ago, in conversations with Robert Smithson, Allan Kaprow referred to museums as mausoleums, and proposed the Guggenheim be emptied of all of its contents and presented as a sculptural form. [1] Today, we still struggle with bringing life into museums. In particular, performance work can be conceptually fraught in the museum when artists have circumvented the commodification and rarefaction of art by creating ephemeral works[…..]

Who Do You Trust? at the Asian Art Museum

David and Hi-Jin Hodge. Who Do You Trust?, 2017 (performance still);  April 20, 2017. Courtesy of the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco. Photo: Quincy Stamper.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Sofia Villena Araya reviews Who Do You Trust? at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco. Dance is a powerful medium in[…..]

Sonic Futures at the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art

Laura Hyunjhee Kim. LOVE NETWORKS LOVE, 2017; video; 2 minutes 32 seconds; and variable objects.

Visitors might be deceived by the initial sounds they hear in Sonic Futures at the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art. A haunting hum resounds throughout the dark exhibition space, originating from a multichannel video installation with an audio mashup of Mariah Carey’s “Fantasy” and Tom Tom Club’s “Genius of Love.” The work, titled They Held Dances on the Graves of Those Who Died in the Terror[…..]

En Plein Air: Music of Objective Romance at SFMOMA

Jacolby Satterwhite. En Plein Air: Music of Objective Romance at SFMOMA, 2017. Courtesy of SFMOMA. Photo: Charles Villyard.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Sofia Villena Araya reviews En Plein Air: Music of Objective Romance at SFMOMA. Jacolby Satterwhite, an African American artist well known for[…..]

Derrick Adams: Network at CAAM

Derrick Adams. Fabrication Station #8, 2016; mixed fabric collage, aluminum hanging rods; 6 x 9 ft. Courtesy of the California African American Museum. Photo: Andy Romer.

Recently many have observed that current American film and television scenarios feel familiar, with offerings that appear diverse and multicultural, as they would have seemed in earlier decades. This is not to say that the struggles of marginalized communities have been overcome; just because a person is visible does not mean that person is liberated. However, media representations can illustrate experiences outside of dominant cultural[…..]

Red in View at the Whitney Museum of American Art

MPA , Entrance, 2014–2016; Pigmented inkjet print mounted on mat board and painted wood; 7 × 7 in. Courtesy of MPA and the Whitney Museum

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Jasa McKenzie assesses Red in View at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Red in View by MPA aims to explore the potential[…..]

Pedro Reyes: Doomocracy at the Brooklyn Army Terminal

Pedro Reyes. Lady Liberty, 2016; installation view, Pedro Reyes: Doomocracy, 2016. Courtesy of Creative Time, New York. Photo: Will Star Shooting Stars Pro

The word “doom” is frequently preceded by “impending” or “certain.” It implies finality—condemnation to a state of catastrophic ruin that overpowers any attempt to forge order and peace. In the case of Doomocracy, an immersive installation and performance in the form of a house of political horrors conceived by Mexico City–based artist Pedro Reyes, doom is employed as part parable and part prophesy—a way to[…..]