Posts Tagged ‘Painting’

D30 Ragnar Þórisson: Human Disguise at Reykjavík Art Museum

Ragnar Þórisson. Untitled, 2017; oil on canvas; 200 x 170 cm. Courtesy of Reykjavík Art Museum.

The Reykjavík Art Museum’s Gallery-D is dedicated to showcasing the work of Icelandic artists who have never mounted a solo exhibition in any of the country’s major museums. D30 Ragnar Þórisson: Human Disguise, the 30th iteration of the series, presents Ragnar Þórisson’s body of psychologically evocative paintings that blur the lines between human experience and myth. These paintings portray states of mind and being with[…..]

Cynthia Daignault: The Pure Products of America Go Crazy at CAPITAL

Cynthia Daignault. 
Matrix, 2017 (detail); oil on linen; 11 x 12 in. Courtesy of the Artist and CAPITAL.

Cynthia Daignault is always confounding our ideas about the nature of painting—and asks if it has an essential nature at all. In her latest show, The Pure Products of America Go Crazy, at CAPITAL in San Francisco (a sort of return home for a prodigal daughter educated at Stanford), she has done it again. Daignault has placed seventy oil-on-linen paintings like dinner plates on six[…..]

Fan Mail: Patricia Smith

Patricia Smith. Marnix Incident, 2012; ink, watercolor, collage, rubber stamps on paper; 24 ¾ x 19 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Patricia Smith’s mapping practice concretizes the ephemeral. Inverting the Situationists’ concept of psychogeography, in which the experience of a place affects a person’s psychological state or behavior, Smith’s maps reinterpret spaces with reference to specific events or feelings. The Incidents series refers to particular moments in time and space. Like any attempt at describing sensation or memory, the results shift and undulate, making room for[…..]

Xochiquetzal: Erotismo y Procreación at ArtSpace México

Rürrü Mipanochia. Xolotl-pie hecho de bola and Muerte-Xolotl, 2016; acrylic, stylographs, and magic markers on paper; 88 x 75.5 cm and 76 x 120 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Artspace México. Photo: Jorge Gomez del Campo.

In Georges Bataille’s eroticism, there is little or no place to theorize about feminine transgression. The feminine is absent in his work. Women, for Bataille, occupy the place of God, a promise of connection with the universe. The only problem is that God is dead. Thus, Bataille’s eroticism only shows us a structure for masculine transgressive pleasure that instrumentalizes feminine bodies in order for masculine subjects[…..]

Fathi Hassan: Edge of Memory at Clark Atlanta University Art Museum

Fathi Hassan. Crossing, 2016; acrylic and gauze on paper; 58.25 x 74.8 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

In his 1978 text Orientalism, Edward Said states that the “subtle and persistent Eurocentric prejudice against Arab–Islamic peoples and their cultures” is not just bound by historical clashes, sociocultural differences, or geography, but a constellation of a “whole series of interests” predicated on the desire to control, manipulate, and incorporate “what is manifestly different.”[1] Under Western hegemonic power, the struggle for dominance in the Middle[…..]

Rina Banerjee: Human Likeness at Hosfelt Gallery

Rina Banerjee. Heavens no place for girls, no sand, no flowers no count of curls no irons to flatten nor straighten or curl you coiled corns, your hair would not leave you naked as girls when all but one could leave open my calls to trumpet her thoughts, stainless steel bikini and sanding wheels for girls who will not open, 2016; blue silver leaf, acrylic, aluminum leaf, and ink on paper; 66 x 30 inches. Courtesy of Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Maddie Klett reviews Rina Banerjee: Human Likeness at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco. Indian artist Rina Banerjee titles her bold paintings and[…..]

Fan Mail: Fei Li

Fei Li. The Hidden Dimension and Other Observations, installation view, 2016; ink on paper, mirrors; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

Experiencing Fei Li’s landscapes is like walking into a jungle. Her tangled calligraphy leaps and coils across the paper like vines, folding in associations with visual language; the disparate sensations of walking through dense vegetation and reading a scrawled manuscript are flattened into one experience, such that the idea that the two were ever separate seems like an abstract theory. Li’s work suggests an almost[…..]