Posts Tagged ‘New York City’

Louise Lawler: Why Pictures Now

Louise Lawler. Pollyanna (adjusted to fit), distorted for the times, 2007/2008/2012. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Metro Pictures, New York. © 2017 Louise Lawler.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Hoi Lun Helen Wong reviews Louise Lawler: Why Pictures Now at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Part of the[…..]

Best of 2008 – Destroying Prettiness: Wangechi Mutu and Kara Walker

walker_k_cat_plates_excavated_g

As part of our ten-year anniversary celebrations, we’re considering the best of a decade of arts publishing. Today’s selection comes from senior editor Vivian Sming, who writes, “Author Catherine Wagley asks us to critically reflect upon the convergence of seduction and brutality in the works of Wangechi Mutu and Kara Walker. This review of Mutu and Walker’s concurrent exhibitions demonstrates the continued and ever-pressing need for[…..]

Best of 2006: Diana Al-Hadid

Diana Al-Hadid. Spun Of The Limits Of My Lonely Waltz, 2006;
wood, polystyrene, plaster, fiberglass, pigment;
72 x 64 x 64 in.

Happy holidays! This year we’re doing something different with our annual “Best Of” series—to celebrate our tenth anniversary, we’re looking back across a decade of art writing. Our first selection comes from our founder Seth Curcio, who writes, “While going back through the very early days of Daily Serving, I stumbled across a post featuring Diana Al-Hadid. I’ve always been captivated by the artist’s sculptures. From[…..]

Jennifer and Kevin McCoy: Broker at Postmasters Gallery

Jennifer & Kevin McCoy. BROKER (still), 2016; video, 28 minutes. Courtesy of the Artists and Postmasters Gallery. Photo: Evan Schwartz

The Postmasters Gallery’s arched storefront entrance on Franklin Street in New York City’s Financial District conjures an era long gone, when artists inhabited the raw lofts of the area. High ceilings with brick and rustic Corinthian columns belie the sleek high-rise trend seeping into the city, which aptly form the setting of Jennifer and Kevin McCoy’s latest exhibition, BROKER. Well-loved for their maquettes often featuring[…..]

Odd Jobs: Kalup Linzy

Kalup Linzy. Romantic Loner. 2013 (still); video; 73:00. Courtesy of the artist.

Welcome to the second issue of “Odd Jobs,” in which we explore the many jobs artists hold in order to support their art practice. I spoke with Kalup Linzy, a New York–based performance and video artist famous for his soap opera–style video works, such as a piece produced for the Studio Museum in Harlem titled All My Churen. Linzy uses low-tech productions methods and often[…..]

A Perfect Storm

Rokni Haerizadeh. But a Storm is Blowing from Paradise. Photo: Ramin Haerizadeh. (© the artist; courtesy the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum)

From our friends at REORIENT, today we bring you author Nur Shkembi’s thoughts on subversive practices in the Guggenheim’s exhibition of Contemporary Middle Eastern and North African Art, But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise. Shkembi states, “This notion of art as a subversive practice is not new; however, redefining the material itself as the place from which ideas are ‘smuggled in’ is certainly compelling.” But a Storm Is Blowing[…..]

Summer Session – Clint Mario and ME, @me_newyork

Clint Mario and ME, @me_newyork

It’s the last day of July—and with it, our final look at the theme of celebrity! We examined the complex intersections of fame, money, desire, and artistic practice this past month, and for our final installment we bring you an ongoing project in New York City by pseudonymic street artists Clint Mario and ME, whose self-reflexive ad takeovers speak to the inherent absurdity of celebrity’s constant jockeying for cultural ubiquity. Tomorrow[…..]