Posts Tagged ‘Lynn Hershman Leeson’

Spotlight: Art Practical

Lynn Hershman Leeson. DiNA, 2004; installation view, Lynn Hershman Leeson: Civic Radar, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, 2017. Courtesy Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Photo: Charlie Villyard.

What’s summer without a series? Over the next few months, Daily Serving is shining a light on some arts publications that we admire. We’re excited to partner with publications such as C&, Chicago Artist Writers, MOMUS, and others, and will highlight the best writing from a different site each week. This week, we’re proud to shine our light on some recent work at our sister site, Art Practical. Today we bring you[…..]

Lynn Hershman Leeson: Civic Radar at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Lynn Hershman Leeson, Seduction of a Cyborg, 1994, Video, color, sound, Run time: 7:17 min. Screenshot taken by the writer.

A confrontation greets us at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts’ current exhibition, Lynn Hershman Leeson: Civic Radar. Immediately upon entering the space, a perceptual split between the virtual and the real is presented by Hershman Leeson’s The Infinity Engine (2014–2017), a row of distorted mirrors that subsumes and reflects our own appearance, as well as a video installation projected on adjacent walls behind us. Through[…..]

Summer Reading: Amie Siegel

Amie Siegel. Still from Provenance, 2013; HD video, color, sound; 40 minutes, 30 seconds. Images courtesy of the artist and Simon Preston Gallery, New York.

As the editors at Art Practical and Daily Serving get ready to take their end-of-summer vacations, we find ourselves swapping reading lists—the articles we’ll dive into once have some uninterrupted time to catch up on what our colleagues have been writing. We’ve gotten so excited about what’s on our lists that we want to share them with our readers. Between now and Labor Day, Daily Serving will feature the efforts of our[…..]

Women: Before and After

Lynn Hershman Leeson is historic.  Some of the most exciting moments of her recent documentary on feminist art, !W.A.R., or !Women Art Revolution, 2010, were shot on her own living room couch.  She and her alter-ego, Roberta Breitmore, are synonymous with an era of women’s art to which all artists (especially—but not exclusively—women) owe a great debt. But we are no longer in the seventies. […..]