Posts Tagged ‘Installation’

Fan Mail: Molly Dierks

Molly Dierks. Hardbodies, 2012; wood, automotive paint, lathed aluminum, mirrors; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

In her work, Molly Dierks forces together concepts of normative femininity and elements of industrial fabrication—sometimes uneasily, other times uncannily well. Using saturated and pastel hues typically associated with women’s products in combination with hard metals and unyielding forms, Dierks makes associations between femininity and fabrication that describe complicity rather than contrasts. Her sculptures do more than point out the labor intrinsic to the production[…..]

Richard Mosse: Incoming at the Barbican

Richard Mosse in collaboration with Trevor Tweeten and Ben Frost. Incoming, 2017; Installation view. The Curve, Barbican Centre, 15 Feb - 23 April 2017. Photo: Tristan Fewings / Getty images

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Eva Mak reviews Richard Mosse: Incoming at the Barbican in London. No matter race, age, origin, or legal status, while the human[…..]

Cecilia Vicuña: About to Happen at Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans

Cecilia Vicuña. Precarios, 1966-2017; site-specific installation of 117 found object sculptures (stone shells, glass, wood, plastic, debris). Courtesy of the Artist and the Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans. Photo: Alex Marks

For the Chilean-born visual artist, poet, and filmmaker Cecilia Vicuña, the textual and the visual exist and function together in a familial relation, as if the making of objects and the shaping of words into images are knotted together like threads, binding and weaving themselves to form reified constellations that speak of the individual and collective simultaneously.[1] Vicuña’s work has a rich engagement with the[…..]

Derrick Adams: Network at CAAM

Derrick Adams. Fabrication Station #8, 2016; mixed fabric collage, aluminum hanging rods; 6 x 9 ft. Courtesy of the California African American Museum. Photo: Andy Romer.

Recently many have observed that current American film and television scenarios feel familiar, with offerings that appear diverse and multicultural, as they would have seemed in earlier decades. This is not to say that the struggles of marginalized communities have been overcome; just because a person is visible does not mean that person is liberated. However, media representations can illustrate experiences outside of dominant cultural[…..]

Hammer Projects: Kevin Beasley at the Hammer Museum

Chair of the Ministers of Defense, 2016; installation view, Hammer Projects: Kevin Beasley, 2017. Courtesy of the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Forrest.
Chair of the Ministers of Defense, 2016; installation view, Hammer Projects: Kevin Beasley, 2017. Courtesy of the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Forrest.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Colony Little reviews Hammer Projects: Kevin Beasley at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. A large black curtain impedes the entrance of[…..]

Fan Mail: Brian Cooper

Brian Cooper. Gratification Management, 2004 (detail); upholstery, synthetic stuffing, staples, zip ties, chicken wire, covered buttons, metal buckets, carpet, wood paneling; 15 x 30 x 2 feet. Courtesy of the Artist.

There is something quite sordid about Brian Cooper’s sculptural installations. The tufted forms in sickly mustard yellows and dark browns seem to ooze over walls, drip down plinths, and pool on aging carpets. As heavy, spreading masses and playful renditions on the theme of corporeality, they are like tactile manifestations of the slow, creeping wave of nausea that comes when one has overstayed an afterparty.[…..]

Rina Banerjee: Human Likeness at Hosfelt Gallery

Rina Banerjee. Heavens no place for girls, no sand, no flowers no count of curls no irons to flatten nor straighten or curl you coiled corns, your hair would not leave you naked as girls when all but one could leave open my calls to trumpet her thoughts, stainless steel bikini and sanding wheels for girls who will not open, 2016; blue silver leaf, acrylic, aluminum leaf, and ink on paper; 66 x 30 inches. Courtesy of Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Maddie Klett reviews Rina Banerjee: Human Likeness at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco. Indian artist Rina Banerjee titles her bold paintings and[…..]