Posts Tagged ‘identity’

Third Space: Shifting Conversations About Contemporary Art at the Birmingham Museum of Art

José Bedia. Mpangui jimagua (Twin Brothers), 2000; acrylic and conté on canvas with objects; 122 x 355 x 188 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and the Birmingham Museum of Art.

As university presidents, corporate CEOs, and political leaders on the left and right toss the terms “multiculturalism” and “postcolonial” around in speeches and promotional materials, I am reminded that these buzzwords of the new transnational order have resisted domestication and dilution through the sharp, thoughtful, uncomplacent writing of Homi K. Bhabha.[1] Bhabha’s recognition that cultures must be understood as complex intersections of multiple places, historical[…..]

Diane Arbus: In the Beginning at SFMOMA

Diane  Arbus. Female  impersonator  holding  long  gloves,  Hempstead,  L.I.,
1959. Courtesy  The Metropolitan  Museum  of Art. © The  Estate  of Diane  Arbus,  LLC.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Max Blue reviews Diane Arbus: In the Beginning at SFMOMA. Diane Arbus: In the Beginning is a meandering, somewhat maudlin journey through the[…..]

Lynn Hershman Leeson: Civic Radar at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Lynn Hershman Leeson, Seduction of a Cyborg, 1994, Video, color, sound, Run time: 7:17 min. Screenshot taken by the writer.

A confrontation greets us at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts’ current exhibition, Lynn Hershman Leeson: Civic Radar. Immediately upon entering the space, a perceptual split between the virtual and the real is presented by Hershman Leeson’s The Infinity Engine (2014–2017), a row of distorted mirrors that subsumes and reflects our own appearance, as well as a video installation projected on adjacent walls behind us. Through[…..]

Best of 2013 – #Hashtags: The Ethnicity Exhibition

Happy holidays! We’re wrapping up the year—and celebrating our tenth anniversary—by taking a look back at the best writing from the last decade. Today’s selection comes from operations manager Addy Rabinovich: “Anuradha Vikram carefully considers the potential problems of curating according to identity politics. Citing Adrian Piper’s controversial withdrawal from Radical Presence, Vikram questions whether the format of the ‘ethnicity exhibition’ truly serves those whose[…..]

Fan Mail: Sarah Beth Woods

Sarah Beth Woods. A Big Diamond, 2016; hair weave, foam, door-knocker earrings; 67 x 7 x 30 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

True to its name, the BRAID/WORK series by Sarah Beth Woods operates within layers of social and material meaning, revealing a deconstructionist character even as it replicates the physical act of weaving. In the creation of these pieces, Woods pulls apart the concepts that make them legible. BRAID/WORK includes a 2016 performance and collaboration between Woods and the Malian-American professional hair braider, teacher, and entrepreneur[…..]

Question Bridge: Black Males in America

Question Bridge: Black Males in America (Aperture/Campaign for Black Male Achievement, 2015)

Today we bring you an excerpt from Art Practical’s Printed Matters column. Roula Seikaly reviews Question Bridge: Black Males in America, the published companion to a project, platform, and installation that regards identity and representation. Seikaly notes, “Asking a question […] can be difficult; it can imply lack of knowledge and experience, rendering the asker vulnerable. No one wants to be caught out, least of all when the questions address identity, community, and most urgently,[…..]

Tony Hope: TH+ at ASHES/ASHES

Tony Hope. Untitled (Hugh), 2015; installation view. Courtesy of the artist and ASHES/ASHES.

Obsessively attuned to the use of space, Tony Hope stages deceptively spare sculptural environments within the gallery of ASHES/ASHES in his first Los Angeles solo exhibition, TH+. The two installations, which are suggestive of one another in their polarity, speak to the larger context of the show as it pertains to the value of manufactured identity. Hope displays a deep understanding of the transience found within subcultural materials that do[…..]