Posts Tagged ‘history’

Interview with Wendy Red Star

Beatrice Red Star Fletcher and Wendy Red Star​. Apsáalooke Feminist #3, 2016. Press image. Courtesy of the Artist.​

Wendy Red Star produces photographs, textile-based works, and performances that situate her womanhood and Crow heritage as ontologically intertwined. Collaborating with fellow Indigenous artists, performers of other disciplines, and her daughter, Red Star documents her various achievements in the contemporary art world through strategies that have historical ties. Ashley Stull Meyers: You have roots in Montana and Colorado. What influenced you to settle in Portland, Oregon,[…..]

#Hashtags: Between Truth and Fiction

ruby onyinyechi amanze. Kindred, 2014; graphite, ink, pigment, enamel, photo transfers, glitter on paper; 80 x 78 inches. Photo courtesy of Tiwani Contemporary, London and the artist.

#truth #history #narrative #Afropolitan #multiculturalism #future In an age when fact and falsehood are often indistinguishable, The Ease of Fiction is a title that gives pause. The exhibition, now at the California African American Museum in Los Angeles, was curated by Dexter Wimberly for the Contemporary Art Museum in Raleigh, North Carolina. Having been invited to participate in the exhibition’s collateral programming as a speaker[…..]

Beverly Buchanan: Ruins and Rituals at the Brooklyn Museum

Beverly Buchanan. Untitled (Double Portrait of Artist with Frustula Sculpture), n.d.; black and white photograph with original paint marks, 8 ½ x 11 inches. ©Estate of Beverly Buchanan, Courtesy of Jane Bridges and the Brooklyn Museum.

A comprehensive and long overdue exhibition of Beverly Buchanan’s work kicks off A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum—a yearlong program of ten exhibitions celebrating the first decade of the museum’s Elizabeth Sackler Feminist Art Center. In a time when voices of misogyny and white supremacy are gaining renewed validation in national political discourse, exploring assumptions around feminism and what feminist art[…..]

The Guerrilla Girls and La Barbe at mfc-michèle didier

La Barbe. Au patriarcat, les hommes reconnaissants [To the patriarchy, the grateful men]; digital print; 8.3 x 11.7 in. Courtesy of La Barbe. Photo: Charles Duprat.

After thirty years of the Guerrilla Girls presenting statistics that repeatedly show the underrepresentation and misrepresentation of women in public collections, museums, and galleries around the world, one would think that these institutions would have been driven to promote changes en masse, if only out of shame. Yet, as the New York–based feminist group keeps evidencing, the archaic status quo in the art world has proven[…..]

Carla Rippey: Resguardo y Resistencia at Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil

Carla Rippey. Cuando mi sangre aún no era mi sangre, 2008-2016 (detail); photo-transfer and sewing on paper; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and the Museu de Arte Carillo Gil, Mexico City. Photo: Jorge Gomez del Campo.

Upon entering Carla Rippey’s retrospective, Resguardo y Resistencia,* at Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil, the viewer is confronted by a large-scale installation that presents a multiplicity of themes carried throughout the exhibition. The installation, Cuando Mi Sangre Aún No Era Mi Sangre [When My Blood Was Not Yet My Blood] (2008–16), consists of dozens of historical archive images transferred onto paper and intervened upon with sewn marks.[…..]

Fan Mail: Taylor Baldwin

Taylor Baldwin. the body, 2012 (video still); HD video with sound; 41:06. Courtesy of the Artist.

Taylor Baldwin’s multidisciplinary practice could be described as an experiment in material and historical mutation. Through a combination of sculptural installations, drawing, and video, the artist investigates the notion of the object as a site of transformation, altered by intangible elements such as the passage of time and death. Though his recent works have been mostly three-dimensional, Baldwin’s entry point into art began with drawing.[…..]

Made in Taiwan: A Retrospective of Yang Mao-Lin at the Taipei Fine Arts Museum

Yang Mao-lin. Zealandia Memorandum L9301 (1993); oil, acrylic on canvas; 112 x 194 cm. Courtesy of Taipei Fine Arts Museum.

A robust Asian democracy, Taiwan elected its first female president earlier this year. Yet thirty years ago, when the island was tentatively emerging from four decades of military rule, this future was far from certain. Made in Taiwan: A Retrospective of Yang Mao-Lin, now on view at Taipei Fine Arts Museum, spans three decades of the artist’s work. His vivid early paintings captured the growing[…..]