Posts Tagged ‘history’

Spotlight: C&

Kemang Wa Lehulere. Installation view Kemang Wa Lehulere: Bird Song at Deutsche Bank KunstHalle, 2017. © Kemang Wa Lehulere, Sophia Lehulere, Gladys Mgudlandlu. Courtesy of STEVENSON Cape Town and Johannesburg. Photo: Mathias Schormann.

This summer, Daily Serving is shining a light on some arts publications that we regularly read and love. Wrapping up our week with C&, today we bring you the final selection from editor-in-chief Yvette Mutumba: an excerpt from an interview with artist Kemang Wa Lehulere about his exhibition Bird Song, which at the time was on view at Deutsche Bank KunstHalle in Berlin. This text was originally published on March[…..]

Spotlight: C&

Euridice Kala. A Conversation I, Entre-de-Lado, 2013. Courtesy of the Artist and C&.

This summer, Daily Serving is shining a light on some arts publications that we admire. Today’s interview from C& is with Mozambican artist Euridice Kala: “Art-making is difficult anywhere, and especially so on the African continent. My first instinct is to be an artist and to be as carefree as possible; however, when you are a young Black woman from Africa (excepting perhaps South Africa and Nigeria), it is really,[…..]

Visual Art and the American Experience at the African American Museum of History and Culture

Visual Art and the American Experience, Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of African American History and Culture Architectural Photrography

In the art world, we don’t talk often enough about the ways in which class defines museums—in particular, art museums—in that their contents are largely formed by the tastes and investments of the rich. There is no other conceivable explanation for the way institutions continue to represent the nation’s art largely as the work of individuals who are White and male. It is in this[…..]

Interview with Wendy Red Star

Beatrice Red Star Fletcher and Wendy Red Star​. Apsáalooke Feminist #3, 2016. Press image. Courtesy of the Artist.​

Wendy Red Star produces photographs, textile-based works, and performances that situate her womanhood and Crow heritage as ontologically intertwined. Collaborating with fellow Indigenous artists, performers of other disciplines, and her daughter, Red Star documents her various achievements in the contemporary art world through strategies that have historical ties. Ashley Stull Meyers: You have roots in Montana and Colorado. What influenced you to settle in Portland, Oregon,[…..]

#Hashtags: Between Truth and Fiction

ruby onyinyechi amanze. Kindred, 2014; graphite, ink, pigment, enamel, photo transfers, glitter on paper; 80 x 78 inches. Photo courtesy of Tiwani Contemporary, London and the artist.

#truth #history #narrative #Afropolitan #multiculturalism #future In an age when fact and falsehood are often indistinguishable, The Ease of Fiction is a title that gives pause. The exhibition, now at the California African American Museum in Los Angeles, was curated by Dexter Wimberly for the Contemporary Art Museum in Raleigh, North Carolina. Having been invited to participate in the exhibition’s collateral programming as a speaker[…..]

Beverly Buchanan: Ruins and Rituals at the Brooklyn Museum

Beverly Buchanan. Untitled (Double Portrait of Artist with Frustula Sculpture), n.d.; black and white photograph with original paint marks, 8 ½ x 11 inches. ©Estate of Beverly Buchanan, Courtesy of Jane Bridges and the Brooklyn Museum.

A comprehensive and long overdue exhibition of Beverly Buchanan’s work kicks off A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum—a yearlong program of ten exhibitions celebrating the first decade of the museum’s Elizabeth Sackler Feminist Art Center. In a time when voices of misogyny and white supremacy are gaining renewed validation in national political discourse, exploring assumptions around feminism and what feminist art[…..]

The Guerrilla Girls and La Barbe at mfc-michèle didier

La Barbe. Au patriarcat, les hommes reconnaissants [To the patriarchy, the grateful men]; digital print; 8.3 x 11.7 in. Courtesy of La Barbe. Photo: Charles Duprat.

After thirty years of the Guerrilla Girls presenting statistics that repeatedly show the underrepresentation and misrepresentation of women in public collections, museums, and galleries around the world, one would think that these institutions would have been driven to promote changes en masse, if only out of shame. Yet, as the New York–based feminist group keeps evidencing, the archaic status quo in the art world has proven[…..]