Posts Tagged ‘Genevieve Quick’

Spotlight: Art Practical

Lynn Hershman Leeson. DiNA, 2004; installation view, Lynn Hershman Leeson: Civic Radar, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, 2017. Courtesy Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Photo: Charlie Villyard.

What’s summer without a series? Over the next few months, Daily Serving is shining a light on some arts publications that we admire. We’re excited to partner with publications such as C&, Chicago Artist Writers, MOMUS, and others, and will highlight the best writing from a different site each week. This week, we’re proud to shine our light on some recent work at our sister site, Art Practical. Today we bring you[…..]

Border Crossings: From Palestine to Mexico

Khaled Jarrar. Khaled’s Ladder, 2016; made from parts of the Mexico/USA border. Courtesy of CULTURUNNERS.

From our sister publication Art Practical today we bring you an article published in Issue 8.1: Art & Citizenship. Author Genevieve Quick considers Khaled Jarrar’s ongoing project Live and Work, which interrogates the borders between Palestine and Israel, and Mexico and the United States. Quick states, “As larger geopolitical issues are debated between international politicians, Jarrar uses art to enact seemingly small gestures that empower himself as an individual,[…..]

Summer Session – Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance, and the Camera Since 1870

Alison Jackson. The Queen plays with her Corgies, from the series Confidential, 2007; chromogenic print; 16 x 12 in. Courtesy the Artist and M+B Gallery, Los Angeles. © Alison Jackson.

For today’s Summer Session topic of celebrity, we bring you Genevieve Quick’s review from our sister publication Art Practical of the 2010 SFMOMA exhibition Exposed, a show on the history of photography and the camera. Our contemporary fascination with celebrities is heavily shaped by the photographic medium, and Exposed explored some of the earliest iterations of the iconic paparazzi shot that is a quintessential celebrity experience. This review was originally published[…..]

Virtual Absence and Presence in the Museum of Stolen Art

Ziv Schneider. Art Detective: The Museum of Stolen Art, 2015; Android VR app. Courtesy of the Artist.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you the most recent edition of their popular “Locating Technology” column, a consideration of the Museum of Stolen Art (MOSA). Author Genevieve Quick notes that “MOSA capitalizes on the unknown: the whereabouts of the artworks, sometimes the conditions of their theft or looting. Rather than explaining the significance of given artworks as conventional museums do, MOSA poses questions about their[…..]

Locating Technology: Raiders and Empires

Stephanie Syjuco. RAIDERS: International Booty, Bountiful Harvest (Selections from the Collection of the A____ A__ M_____) (installation view), 2011; digital archival photo prints mounted onto laser-cut wood, hardware, crates; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Catharine Clark, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Genevieve Quick’s most recent “Locating Technology” column, a consideration of artist Stephanie Syjuco’s process and practice: “[Syjuco] prompts viewers to consider more broadly the legality and ethics of museums’ collections, and suggests that museums are institutions of cultural appropriation.” This article was originally published on October 27, 2015. Much of the history of museum collections is related to[…..]

Raiders and Empires

Stephanie Syjuco. Empire/Other: Morphset E, 2013 (video still); 3D animated video. Courtesy of the Artist and FLACC Workplace for Visual Artists, Belgium.

In these projects Syjuco harnesses technologies of distribution and reproduction—the web, photography, and 3D scanning and printing—to create objects that reveal the tangled history of colonization and cultural hybridization.

Mechanized Bodies: Anxiety and Healing in a Global Economy

Vicky Funari and Sergio De La Torre. Maquilapolis (City of Factories) (still by David Maung), 2006; film; 68:00. Courtesy of the Artists.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you an essay on art, manufacturing, and workers’ bodies. Author Genevieve Quick explains, “Whether in the U.S., Mexico, or India, workers endure the same cycle: becoming part of a larger network of production that can be disassembled and relocated, rendering them redundant. Assembly-line production has taken its toll on workers’ bodies since the beginning of industrialization, and its absence[…..]