Posts Tagged ‘Citizenship’

Beyond the Canvas: Contemporary Art from Puerto Rico at Newcomb Museum

Elsa María Meléndez, El Ingenio Colectivo o la Maldición de la Cotorra, 2014;
Installation view, Beyond the Canvas, 2017. Courtesy of Newcomb Museum.

Ni de aqui, ni de alla—neither from here or there. This is something you might hear on the streets of Puerto Rico as people consider what it means to be both citizens of the United States and colonized subjects of an antiquated political system. This year, Puerto Rico had the largest bankruptcy case in the history of the American market. The island’s total debt, according[…..]

Precarious Citizenship

Gazi Nafis Ahmed. Shahinoor & Nipa #2, 2013. Courtesy of the Artist. “I am a woman and I love another woman. I want to live with my lover. I don’t want anyone to come between us. We don’t want anyone among us to commit suicide, to get hurt, to become addicted to drugs, to cut themselves. Let us live the way we want to. Now is the time to open up and talk about it.”

Today, as we in the United States live our first day under a new administration, we bring you John Zarobell’s “Precarious Citizenship.” Originally published in Art Practical’s issue 8.1, this article explores the “precarious citizenship” of Gazi Nafis Ahmed, a Bangladeshi artist whose rich black-and white portraits of queer communities have gained unwanted fundamentalist attention, making it unsafe for him to remain in his country. Zarobell says, “Precarious citizenship is[…..]

Between Citizenry and Privilege: Ai Weiwei and Bouchra Khalili

Ai Weiwei and Rowlit Chawla. Weiwei on Lesvos Beach, 2016. Photo: Rowlit Chawla for India Today.

Today from our sister publication Art Practical we bring you Jordan Amirkhani’s article from 8.1: Art + Citizenship. Amirkhani discusses the recent work of artists Ai Weiwei and Bouchra Khalili as they respond to global crises. Amirkhani quotes Hannah Arendt, who speaks to citizenship and  those who lack the “rights to rights,” saying, “If a human being loses his political status, he should, according to the implications of the inborn[…..]