Posts Tagged ‘Blackness’

Southern Accent: Seeking the American South in Contemporary Art

Barkley L. Hendricks. Down Home Taste, 1971; oil and linen on acrylic; 48 x 48 in. Courtesy of the Artist and the Office of the Dean of Students, Cornell University (Ithaca, NY).

In her 1960 essay “Some Aspects of the Grotesque in Southern Fiction,” writer Flannery O’Connor states, “Anything that comes out of the South is going to be called grotesque by the northern reader, unless it is grotesque, in which case it is going to be called realistic.”[1] Aware of the deeply moralizing labels and qualifiers imposed upon her work and career-long subject of the South,[…..]

Curating in an Era of Change: In Conversation With E. Jane

E. Jane. Notes on softness, 2016, NewHive site.

Today from our friends at ARTS.BLACK we bring you the third installment of author Ashley Stull Meyers’ series Curating in an Era of Change.  In this iteration of the work, Meyers interviews conceptual artist E. Jane. They discuss the internet as exhibition space, academia, and navigating the art world—and the world at large—as Black women. E. Jane states, “I think the social media feed has some Utopian possibility[…..]

Paul Stephen Benjamin: God Bless America at Poem 88

Paul Stephen Benjamin. God Bless America, 2016; 3-channel video installation, sixty-five video monitors, DVDs, cables, and cords; installation shot. Courtesy of Poem 88, Atlanta, GA. Photo: Robin Bernat.

Paul Stephen Benjamin’s current video installation at Poem 88 in Atlanta, Georgia, God Bless America (2016), is a monument to the ambiguous relations between cultural achievement and state patriotism within the contemporary African American political experience.[1] Read against the traumatic history—and current iterations—of racial terror, state violence, and surveillance leveled systematically at Black Americans throughout our nation’s history, God Bless America’s synthesis of flickering and[…..]

Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic at Seattle Art Museum

Kehinde Wiley. Mrs. Waldorf Astor, 2012; oil on linen; 72 x 60 inches. © Kehinde Wiley.

A New Republic at Seattle Art Museum is Kehinde Wiley’s second solo exhibition organized by the Brooklyn Museum. In his brief fifteen-year career, Wiley has quickly become an established cultural trope. His works have adorned the set of Empire and served as icons of the FIFA World Cup. His portraits of Black men and women are at once celebrated as a vision of Black empowerment[…..]

Howardena Pindell at Spelman College Museum of Fine Art

The Spelman College Museum of Fine Art’s current exhibition of Howardena Pindell’s work marks an important moment in the journey of an artist and an institution. The site of Pindell’s first major exhibition in 1972, the Spelman Museum in those years was not the sprawling 4,500-square-foot institution that it is now, and Pindell had not been established as the great artist, gallery director, curator, educator,[…..]

#Hashtags: Black Futurism: The Creative Destruction and Reconstruction of Race in Contemporary Art

nuri Kahiu. Pumzi, film still, 2009. Courtesy Focus Features Africa First Short Film Program.

#blackness #afrofuturism #identity #agency #mobility Today we’re partnering with our friends at ART21 Magazine to bring you Nettrice Gaskins‘ excellent consideration of “Black futurism as a form of creative expression [that] pushes against the conventional limits of black subjectivity.” This article was originally published on June 24, 2014, in the “Future” issue of ART21 Magazine. For the online research project Liquid Blackness, Alessandra Raengo reflects on[…..]

Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art at NYU’s Grey Art Gallery

Jean-Ulrick Désert. Negerhosen2000 / The Travel Albums, 2003. From a series of forty digitally printed images, pigmented inks, and pencil on archival paper with mixed media collage. 11 3/4 x 8 1/4 in. Courtesy the artist.

How is Blackness performed?  Most African American contemporary artists will admit in confidence that they are often expected to perform their Blackness for the power players of the art mainstream, regardless of their choice of artistic medium. Artists working in two dimensions such as Kerry James Marshall, Kara Walker, and Wangechi Mutu have gained currency by creating work that makes the construction of black identity[…..]