Posts Tagged ‘Birmingham’

Third Space: Shifting Conversations About Contemporary Art at the Birmingham Museum of Art

José Bedia. Mpangui jimagua (Twin Brothers), 2000; acrylic and conté on canvas with objects; 122 x 355 x 188 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and the Birmingham Museum of Art.

As university presidents, corporate CEOs, and political leaders on the left and right toss the terms “multiculturalism” and “postcolonial” around in speeches and promotional materials, I am reminded that these buzzwords of the new transnational order have resisted domestication and dilution through the sharp, thoughtful, uncomplacent writing of Homi K. Bhabha.[1] Bhabha’s recognition that cultures must be understood as complex intersections of multiple places, historical[…..]

From the Archives – Taravat Talepasand: Not an Arab Spring at Beta Pictoris Gallery

. Taravat Talepasand. Khomeini, 2015; egg tempura on linen; 48 x 36 in.

Spurred by recent elections in the US and abroad, there’s been a resurgence of interest by artists and critics alike in so-called “political art.” Today from our archives we bring you a review of Taravat Talepasand’s work at Beta Pictoris; author Jordan Amirkhani argues that Telepasand’s work operates much in the same way as Andy Warhol’s, wherein a cultural actor becomes a symbolic fetish to[…..]

Luis Cruz Azaceta: War and Other Disasters at Abroms-Engel Institute for the Visual Arts

Luis Cruz Azaceta. Hell Act, 2009; acrylic, charcoal, pencil, and shellac on canvas; 72 x 160 in. Courtesy of the artist and the Abroms-Engel Institute for the Visual Arts.

Over the past four decades, Luis Cruz Azaceta has continued to mine the vast possibilities of expressionism—a style that often lends itself to forms of humanism, idealism, originality, and angst that feel more fitting for the 20th century than our current moment. Yet the artist is vigilant in his desire to respond to the world around him, and refuses to retreat into a formal world[…..]

Taravat Talepasand: Not an Arab Spring at Beta Pictoris Gallery

. Taravat Talepasand. Khomeini, 2015; egg tempura on linen; 48 x 36 in.

Taravat Talepasand’s work takes on the representational codes and image systems of the Iranian state: national currency, political propaganda, religious iconography, and gendered forms of identity making. The paintings in Not an Arab Spring open up the ideological assumptions that index Iranian identity, state power, and gender in order to consider how the body (male and female) comes to signify the state as well as[…..]