Posts Tagged ‘Art Practical’

Teaching and Talking about Art and Performance in Unpresidented Times

Johanna Poethig. Songs for Women Living With War, 2016. Courtesy of the Artist.

Today from our sister publication Art Practical, we bring you Thea Quiray Tagle’s article from issue 8.3: Art can’t do anything if we don’t. Quiray Tagle highlights the importance of teaching art in its most intersectional and inclusive form and actively engaging with politics and current events. She states, “For those teaching art and social change in the ongoing aftermath of this election—thank you. For those joining political[…..]

The Birth of the Author

Rebecca Belmore. Ayumee-aawach Oomama-mowen: Speaking to Their Mother, 1991; Presented by the Walter Phillips Gallery as part of the exhibition Bureau de Change, July 12–September 28, 2008. Banff National Park, Johnsons Lake, July 26th, 2008; Courtesy of the Walter Phillips Gallery, Banff Centre. Photo: Sarah Ciurysek.

Today from our sister publication Art Practical we bring you Andrew Berardini’s article published in issue 8.3: Art can’t do anything if we don’t. Berardini finds the place where art and self-expression exist in the face of illicit power. He states, “If it does nothing else, art gives us authorship of our experience. Layers of meaning and exchange, the nuances of aesthetics and economics, and the complexity[…..]

ABOLISH BORDERS as Revolutionary Futurity

Gilda Posada. ABOLISH BORDERS, 2017; installed at Galería de la Raza, San Francisco. Courtesy of the Artist.

Today, from our friends at Art Practical we bring you Carlos Jackson’s article in issue 8.3: Art can’t do anything if we don’t. Jackson hails artist Gilda Posada’s large-scale billboard installation, ABOLISH BORDERS, located on the wall of Galería de la Raza, as an embodiment of the Chicanx claim, “sin fronteras.” Jackson says of the billboard, “The billboard creates and imagines a generous form of community through its[…..]

“No Need for Silence”: Art as Collective Address

Hank Willis Thomas. Black Righteous Space, 2012; multimedia, 01:57; dimensions variable. Courtesy of Hank Willis Thomas and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

From our sister publication Art Practical, today we bring you Deena Chalabi’s article in issue 8.3: Art Can’t Do Anything If We Don’t. This issue explores the role of art in times of crisis, and how it both succeeds and fails as a call to action and political tool. Chalabi states, “Art offers alternatives to ideas and images prepackaged for us by politicians or corporations (rarely are we[…..]

Signs of the Times

Organizers put the Women’s March on Washington in Washington D.C. on Saturday Jan. 21, 2017. Photo: Alanna Vagianos, Huffington Post.

Today from our sister publication Art Practical we bring you Ashley Stull Meyers’ article from issue 8.3: Art can’t do anything if we don’t. Meyers discusses the collecting institution’s role in politics and protest, exploring “what, how, and to what ends our cultural institutions collect,” specifically in regard to protest ephemera. This article was originally published on March 23, 2017. January 21 of this year was a[…..]

A Quinquennial and Two Biennials

Forget Fear, 2012; installation view of the KW Institute for Contemporary Art’s ground floor, 7th Berlin Biennale, 2012. Courtesy of Frieze.

Today we honor the work of our friend and contributor Leigh Markopoulos, who died tragically on Friday after a car accident in Los Angeles. Leigh worked at Serpentine Gallery, Hayward Gallery, and the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts; eventually becoming the Chair of the Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice at California College of the Arts, where she shaped more than a decade of cohorts of MA students in the first[…..]

Precarious Citizenship

Gazi Nafis Ahmed. Shahinoor & Nipa #2, 2013. Courtesy of the Artist. “I am a woman and I love another woman. I want to live with my lover. I don’t want anyone to come between us. We don’t want anyone among us to commit suicide, to get hurt, to become addicted to drugs, to cut themselves. Let us live the way we want to. Now is the time to open up and talk about it.”

Today, as we in the United States live our first day under a new administration, we bring you John Zarobell’s “Precarious Citizenship.” Originally published in Art Practical’s issue 8.1, this article explores the “precarious citizenship” of Gazi Nafis Ahmed, a Bangladeshi artist whose rich black-and white portraits of queer communities have gained unwanted fundamentalist attention, making it unsafe for him to remain in his country. Zarobell says, “Precarious citizenship is[…..]