Posts Tagged ‘activism’

From the Archives – Help Desk: Burning Bridges

Today, we bring you a Help Desk column from our archives about doing more harm than good. Bean Gilsdorf’s critique still rings true: “If your activism turns you into a celebrity but does nothing to change the brutality you supposedly decry, your innocent intentions become worse than worldly cynicism.” Submit your arts-related questions anonymously here. This article was originally published on April 30, 2012. If an artist[…..]

Still Raising Hell at Emory University

James V. Hatch and Camille Billops On the UCLA Campus, 1960; Photograph; Dimensions Unknown. Courtesy of The Camille Billops and James V. Hatch Archives at Emory University (Atlanta, GA).

Gifted to the Stuart A. Rose Library at Emory University in Atlanta in 2002, the Camille Billops and James V. Hatch Archives—a remarkable collection of books, ephemera, and oral histories documenting the rich histories of 19th and 20th-century African American art, art history, and theater—remain one of the most significant holdings of African American cultural achievement in the United States. The archive was initiated in[…..]

Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World at the Hammer Museum

Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World, installation view, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, January 29 – May 7, 2017. Photo: Brian Forrest.

Among obsidian stones, an upturned police barricade, a beat-up refrigerator, and cow vertebrae, the detail that lingers longest in Jimmie Durham’s retrospective, on view at the Hammer Museum, is Durham’s absence. Born in Arkansas in 1940, Durham left the United States thirty years ago for Europe and has largely refrained from exhibiting in the U.S. since, giving a provocative tone to the retrospective’s title, At[…..]

Activestills: Photography as Protest in Palestine/Israel

In a new book, the esteemed photojournalist Miki Kratsman describes the uneasy recognition by some former students at Tel Aviv’s Geographic Photography College in 2005: The relationship between photojournalists and media outlets was rapidly shifting in a direction that did not favor visual storytellers, as online platforms achieved supremacy and content demands increased exponentially. From their insecurity sprang Activestills, a collective of dedicated photographers whose[…..]

The Guerrilla Girls and La Barbe at mfc-michèle didier

La Barbe. Au patriarcat, les hommes reconnaissants [To the patriarchy, the grateful men]; digital print; 8.3 x 11.7 in. Courtesy of La Barbe. Photo: Charles Duprat.

After thirty years of the Guerrilla Girls presenting statistics that repeatedly show the underrepresentation and misrepresentation of women in public collections, museums, and galleries around the world, one would think that these institutions would have been driven to promote changes en masse, if only out of shame. Yet, as the New York–based feminist group keeps evidencing, the archaic status quo in the art world has proven[…..]

Interview with Carlos Motta

Carlos Motta. Patriots, Citizens, Lovers..., 2015; installation view.  PinchukArtCentre, Kiev. Courtesy of Instituto de Visión, Bogotá, Mor Charpentier Galerie, Paris, and Galeria Filomena Soares, Lisbon.

Today from our friends at BOMB Magazine, we bring you an interview with artist Carlos Motta. Author Cat Tyc writes, “Motta’s research-based practice is constituted by discursive spaces, presented in a variety of different spatial forms, which create—in his own words—’counter-narratives that recognize suppressed histories, communities, and identities.’” This article was originally published May 6, 2016. Cat Tyc: At your artist talk at Pratt Institute, you[…..]

Summer Reading – (Un)doing (Un)compensation

Caroline Woolard. ourgoods.org cards, 2010. Courtesy of the Artist.

In selecting the articles for our Summer Reading series—ones that we think exemplify current issues in the field of contemporary art—we would be remiss if we did not include Caroline Woolard’s consideration of “[the] seven ways in which I attempt to navigate inequity within institutions and collective projects.” This article was originally published in Art Practical’s special issue “Valuing Labor in the Arts” on April 3, 2014.[…..]