Posts Tagged ‘activism’

Talking About 100 Days Action, Part 2

Ricki Dwyer. Shred and Re-weave the American Flag, 2017; participatory action, performed on January 27, 2017, at Open Windows Cooperative in San Francisco, as part of 100 Days Action. Courtesy of the Artist.

April 30 is the last of Donald Trump’s first 100 days in office. To mark that inauspicious event, I spoke with Kenneth Lo, artist and social media manager for 100 Days Action, and artist Ricki Dwyer, who contributed the intervention Shred and Re-weave the American Flag. Our discussion ranged from how resistance efforts have changed since the inauguration, to the role artist–activists play in those efforts[…..]

Talking About 100 Days Action, Part 1

Jenifer K Wofford. No Scrubs, 2017; participatory action, performed on January 21, 2017, at the Women's Marches in San Francisco and Oakland, as part of 100 Days Action. Courtesy of 100.

On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump reached the nation’s highest political office after a long and brutal election cycle. In response, artists throughout the United States mobilized to resist regressive policy changes that would set progressive efforts back by at least fifty years. Writer and activist Ingrid Rojas Contreras collaborated with numerous Bay Area artists to form 100 Days Action, a creative affiliation described as[…..]

From the Archives – Help Desk: Burning Bridges

Today, we bring you a Help Desk column from our archives about doing more harm than good. Bean Gilsdorf’s critique still rings true: “If your activism turns you into a celebrity but does nothing to change the brutality you supposedly decry, your innocent intentions become worse than worldly cynicism.” Submit your arts-related questions anonymously here. This article was originally published on April 30, 2012. If an artist[…..]

Still Raising Hell at Emory University

James V. Hatch and Camille Billops On the UCLA Campus, 1960; Photograph; Dimensions Unknown. Courtesy of The Camille Billops and James V. Hatch Archives at Emory University (Atlanta, GA).

Gifted to the Stuart A. Rose Library at Emory University in Atlanta in 2002, the Camille Billops and James V. Hatch Archives—a remarkable collection of books, ephemera, and oral histories documenting the rich histories of 19th and 20th-century African American art, art history, and theater—remain one of the most significant holdings of African American cultural achievement in the United States. The archive was initiated in[…..]

Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World at the Hammer Museum

Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World, installation view, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, January 29 – May 7, 2017. Photo: Brian Forrest.

Among obsidian stones, an upturned police barricade, a beat-up refrigerator, and cow vertebrae, the detail that lingers longest in Jimmie Durham’s retrospective, on view at the Hammer Museum, is Durham’s absence. Born in Arkansas in 1940, Durham left the United States thirty years ago for Europe and has largely refrained from exhibiting in the U.S. since, giving a provocative tone to the retrospective’s title, At[…..]

Activestills: Photography as Protest in Palestine/Israel

In a new book, the esteemed photojournalist Miki Kratsman describes the uneasy recognition by some former students at Tel Aviv’s Geographic Photography College in 2005: The relationship between photojournalists and media outlets was rapidly shifting in a direction that did not favor visual storytellers, as online platforms achieved supremacy and content demands increased exponentially. From their insecurity sprang Activestills, a collective of dedicated photographers whose[…..]

The Guerrilla Girls and La Barbe at mfc-michèle didier

La Barbe. Au patriarcat, les hommes reconnaissants [To the patriarchy, the grateful men]; digital print; 8.3 x 11.7 in. Courtesy of La Barbe. Photo: Charles Duprat.

After thirty years of the Guerrilla Girls presenting statistics that repeatedly show the underrepresentation and misrepresentation of women in public collections, museums, and galleries around the world, one would think that these institutions would have been driven to promote changes en masse, if only out of shame. Yet, as the New York–based feminist group keeps evidencing, the archaic status quo in the art world has proven[…..]