Text

Cynthia Daignault: The Pure Products of America Go Crazy at CAPITAL

Cynthia Daignault. 
Matrix, 2017 (detail); oil on linen; 11 x 12 in. Courtesy of the Artist and CAPITAL.

Cynthia Daignault is always confounding our ideas about the nature of painting—and asks if it has an essential nature at all. In her latest show, The Pure Products of America Go Crazy, at CAPITAL in San Francisco (a sort of return home for a prodigal daughter educated at Stanford), she has done it again. Daignault has placed seventy oil-on-linen paintings like dinner plates on six[…..]

Cecilia Vicuña: About to Happen at Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans

Cecilia Vicuña. Precarios, 1966-2017; site-specific installation of 117 found object sculptures (stone shells, glass, wood, plastic, debris). Courtesy of the Artist and the Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans. Photo: Alex Marks

For the Chilean-born visual artist, poet, and filmmaker Cecilia Vicuña, the textual and the visual exist and function together in a familial relation, as if the making of objects and the shaping of words into images are knotted together like threads, binding and weaving themselves to form reified constellations that speak of the individual and collective simultaneously.[1] Vicuña’s work has a rich engagement with the[…..]

Fathi Hassan: Edge of Memory at Clark Atlanta University Art Museum

Fathi Hassan. Crossing, 2016; acrylic and gauze on paper; 58.25 x 74.8 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

In his 1978 text Orientalism, Edward Said states that the “subtle and persistent Eurocentric prejudice against Arab–Islamic peoples and their cultures” is not just bound by historical clashes, sociocultural differences, or geography, but a constellation of a “whole series of interests” predicated on the desire to control, manipulate, and incorporate “what is manifestly different.”[1] Under Western hegemonic power, the struggle for dominance in the Middle[…..]

Dread Scott: Past, Present & Future at Guerrero Gallery

Dread Scott. A Man Was Lynched by Police Yesterday, 2015; embroidered nylon; 84 x 52.5 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Guerrero Gallery, San Francisco.

Dread Scott has a long history of creating provocative works that address the hypocrisies and injustices within the United States. Unfortunately, his extremely sparse solo exhibition, Past, Present & Future at Guerrero Gallery, underwhelms. Spread between the main gallery and the project space, the show presents three very commanding works that span a thirteen-year period. Scott’s exhibition feels like a local display of highly publicized[…..]

Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World at the Hammer Museum

Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World, installation view, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, January 29 – May 7, 2017. Photo: Brian Forrest.

Among obsidian stones, an upturned police barricade, a beat-up refrigerator, and cow vertebrae, the detail that lingers longest in Jimmie Durham’s retrospective, on view at the Hammer Museum, is Durham’s absence. Born in Arkansas in 1940, Durham left the United States thirty years ago for Europe and has largely refrained from exhibiting in the U.S. since, giving a provocative tone to the retrospective’s title, At[…..]

Curating in an Era of Change: In Conversation With E. Jane

E. Jane. Notes on softness, 2016, NewHive site.

Today from our friends at ARTS.BLACK we bring you the third installment of author Ashley Stull Meyers’ series Curating in an Era of Change.  In this iteration of the work, Meyers interviews conceptual artist E. Jane. They discuss the internet as exhibition space, academia, and navigating the art world—and the world at large—as Black women. E. Jane states, “I think the social media feed has some Utopian possibility[…..]

An Atlas of Mirrors: Singapore Biennale 2016

Titarubi. History Repeats Itself, 2016; Gold-plated nutmeg, copper-plated wood, nickel-plated wood, burnt wood, sampan, wood, aluminium, copper, soil, light and nutmeg perfume; Dimensions variable. Image courtesy of Singapore Art Museum.

There is no shortage of mirrors and maps in the fifth iteration of the Singapore Biennale. Glass mirrors in Harumi Yukutake’s Paracosmos (2016) curve around the main circular stairwell of the Singapore Art Museum, dazzling the eye as light hits their multiple reflective surfaces. Dozens of mirrors appear in their reflections; dozens more yet, to the power of infinity, show up in the reflections of their reflections. In[…..]