Sculpture

Ludovic Duchâteau: In Dreamland at A Stark Project

Ludovic Duchateau. In Dreamland, 2016; installation view, A Stark Project, Berkeley. Courtesy of the Artist and A Stark Project. Photo: Hillary Goidell.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Noah Sudarsky reviews Ludovic Duchâteau: In Dreamland at A Stark Project in Berkeley. French sculptor Ludovic Duchâteau’s first solo show in the[…..]

Best of 2009 – Moby Dick

Moby Dick at the Wattis Institute, 2009.

We are looking back on a decade of Daily Serving’s greatest hits, and today’s selection comes from Shotgun Reviews editor Jen Stager: “‘This great white interior was empty even when it was full, because most of what was in it didn’t belong in it and would soon be purged from it. This was people, mainly, and what they brought with them from outside,’ wrote David[…..]

Follicular: The Hair Stories of Sonya Clark at the Taubman Museum of Art

Sonya Clark. The Hair Craft Project: Hairstyles on Canvas, 2013; silk threads, beads, shells, and yarn on canvas; 29 x 29 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and the Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke, VA.

Follicular: The Hair Stories of Sonya Clark at the Taubman Museum of Art highlights the historically rich and embodied power of Black hair, demonstrating that hair is a medium as well as a message.[1] For Clark, whose work holds a significant place in the burgeoning discourse of American contemporary craft, Black hair is an aesthetic language on par with the legacies of quilting and textile[…..]

John Buck at Robischon Gallery

John Buck. The Immigration, 2016; jelutong wood, acrylic paint, leather, motors; 114 x 268 x 168 in. Courtesy of Robischon Gallery.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Kate Nicholson reviews John Buck at Robischon Gallery in Denver. John Buck’s colossal kinetic sculptures draw passersby into Robischon Gallery, including families[…..]

Sculptures and People

Gordon Newell. Valley Landing, (date unknown); installation view, Fulton Mall (Fresno, CA). Photo: Elena Harvey Collins, 2016

Today we bring you an Elena Harvey Collins essay from our sister publication, Art Practical. Harvey Collins explores the genius loci of the Fulton Mall in Fresno, California, its history and redevelopment, and the public artworks that surround it. She says “The mall had the feeling of a permanent film set made for the performance of civic life—one steeped in magical realism. ‘I woke up feelin’[…..]

Beverly Buchanan: Ruins and Rituals at the Brooklyn Museum

Beverly Buchanan. Untitled (Double Portrait of Artist with Frustula Sculpture), n.d.; black and white photograph with original paint marks, 8 ½ x 11 inches. ©Estate of Beverly Buchanan, Courtesy of Jane Bridges and the Brooklyn Museum.

A comprehensive and long overdue exhibition of Beverly Buchanan’s work kicks off A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum—a yearlong program of ten exhibitions celebrating the first decade of the museum’s Elizabeth Sackler Feminist Art Center. In a time when voices of misogyny and white supremacy are gaining renewed validation in national political discourse, exploring assumptions around feminism and what feminist art[…..]

Spectres at Mor Charpentier

Fredi Casco. The Return of The Sorcerers, Vol. 1, 2005; Digital print; 7.8x9.8 in. Courtesy of the artist.

Phantoms of Latin American conflicts loom in Spectres, an exhibition by Fredi Casco, Teresa Margolles, and Rosângela Rennó at Mor Charpentier gallery in Paris. Inspired by Roland Barthes’ seminal text Camera Lucida, the exhibition organizes itself around the concept of the spectrum, as understood by Barthes—who wrote the book while trying to symbolically conjure the presence of his recently deceased mother—as the object pictured in[…..]