Sculpture

Issues of Power: Resilience and Healing

Juan Roberto Diago. Aché Pa’ Los Míos [Good Vibes for My People], 1999, mixed media on burlap. Courtesy of The Cooper Gallery.

Today from our friends at Big Red & Shiny, we bring you a conversation between artist Chanel Thervil and artist and curator Silví Naçí. They discuss artist Juan Roberto Diago’s first retrospective, curated by Alejandro de la Fuente at the Cooper Gallery. Naci parallels the exploration of diasporic Africans in colonized Cuba in Diago’s work with the current political state of the U.S., saying, “…during a crucial moment in U.S.[…..]

Meat Is Murder

Soukaina Joual. Halal, 2016; light panel; 13.7 x 13.2 in.

Today from our friends at REORIENT we bring you Zöe Hu’s article on artist Soukaina Joual. Hu says of Joual’s exploration of meat as a subject, “Meat’s link to violence is an easily made one, and it only takes the viewer another thoughtless step forward to affix the MENA region onto that relationship; but Joual avoids the obvious constellation of meat–violence–Arab world, instead tinkering with a[…..]

Rina Banerjee: Human Likeness at Hosfelt Gallery

Rina Banerjee. Heavens no place for girls, no sand, no flowers no count of curls no irons to flatten nor straighten or curl you coiled corns, your hair would not leave you naked as girls when all but one could leave open my calls to trumpet her thoughts, stainless steel bikini and sanding wheels for girls who will not open, 2016; blue silver leaf, acrylic, aluminum leaf, and ink on paper; 66 x 30 inches. Courtesy of Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Maddie Klett reviews Rina Banerjee: Human Likeness at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco. Indian artist Rina Banerjee titles her bold paintings and[…..]

Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World at the Hammer Museum

Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World, installation view, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, January 29 – May 7, 2017. Photo: Brian Forrest.

Among obsidian stones, an upturned police barricade, a beat-up refrigerator, and cow vertebrae, the detail that lingers longest in Jimmie Durham’s retrospective, on view at the Hammer Museum, is Durham’s absence. Born in Arkansas in 1940, Durham left the United States thirty years ago for Europe and has largely refrained from exhibiting in the U.S. since, giving a provocative tone to the retrospective’s title, At[…..]

Jibade-Khalil Huffman: Kush Is My Cologne at Anat Ebgi

Jibade-Khalil Huffman. By The Author of Another Country and Nobody Knows My Name, 2017; transparencies in double light box; 35 x 31 x 6 1/8 in. Courtesy of Anat Ebgi. Photo: Michael Underwood.

Jibade-Khalil Huffman’s solo exhibition at Anat Ebgi, Kush Is My Cologne, lifts its title from a track on Gucci Mane’s 2009 major label debut, The State vs. Radric Davis. The allusion is one of many in Huffman’s exhibition that indicate his fixation with the popular nodes that drive contemporary cultural production, particularly, the profundity and cultural insistence of hip-hop in a world that often refuses[…..]

This Is Not Iranian

Anahita Razmi. Middle East Coast West Coast, 2014 (video still); HD Video; 23:04.

From our friends at REORIENT, today we bring you Joobin Bekhrad’s conversation with artist Anahita Razmi. Bekhrad and Razmi discuss identity, underwear, and the Pakyan. Razmi states, “I like the idea than an identity is something that one constructs, something that is at all times flexible and changing.” This article was originally published January 3, 2017. What was I doing near Trafalgar Square? I don’t know.[…..]

From the Archives – Vesna Pavlović: LOST ART at Zeitgeist Gallery

Vesna Pavlović. Video Still, May 25, 1979, Television, Belgrade. 2015. Endura metallic print. 20.5 x 14 inches. Image courtesy of the artist and Zeitgeist Gallery (Nashville, TN).

“Instability, fragmentation, and brokenness”—these words could easily refer to the current global political situation, yet here they specify the 20th-century regime of Josep Broz Tito, a Yugoslavian revolutionary whose later presidential reign was marked by repression and human-rights violations. In street protests, as in galleries and museums, citizens around the world are turning to imaginative expressions of their fears and objections, and we are reminded of the[…..]