Sculpture

Spotlight: Chicago Artist Writers

Dan Graham, Pavilion/Sculpture for Argonne (detail), 1982; Photograph by the writer, 2015

This summer, Daily Serving is shining a light on some of the commendable arts publications that we regularly read, and this week we’re spending some time with Chicago Artist Writers. In “The Geese at Argonne: On Dan Graham’s Pavilion/Sculpture for Argonne,” artist and writer Yuri Stone discusses a road trip to visit a forgotten Dan Graham sculpture on the campus of the Argonne National Laboratory outside of[…..]

Step of Two at Royal Nonesuch Gallery

Right: Henna Vainio, Legs (orange), 2017; plaster, pigment, fiberglass, steel; 78 x 8 x 8 in. Left: Emily Mast. ENDE (Like a New Beginning), 2014 (video still); HD color video with sound; 7:30 sec. Courtesy of Royal Nonesuch Gallery. Photo: Dana Hemenway.

Step of Two, the current exhibition by Emily Mast and Henna Vainio at Royal Nonesuch, tenderly complicates ideas of action versus inaction. Two freestanding sculptures by Vainio have an immediate presence, with bright colors and abstract forms that suggest human postures. To make them, Vainio pours pigmented plaster into corrugated-cardboard cylindrical molds, which collapse and bend under the weight of the plaster. Once set, the plaster[…..]

Hashtags: The Body Without Organs

Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between. Gallery View, Clothes/Not Clothes: War/Peace. © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

#embodiment #performance #fashion #commerce #beauty #ReiKawakubo Given their constant presence in our lives, we think surprisingly little about our bodies. When we do, we are often thinking of ways to make them less body, more commodity. For women in particular, the body is the site of our social acceptability and our abjection. Fashion is how we navigate that landscape. Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah has proposed that the[…..]

Made in Iran, Born in America

Taravat Talepasand. Iran, Iran, Iran, Iran (detail); 2017. Metal, rope, denim, pigment, hand match patches, assorted pins, iPhone 7 plus. Collaboration with Laura Rokas.

Today, from our friends at REORIENT, we bring you Joobin Bekhrad’s interview with artist Taravat Talepasand, aka TVAT. They discuss Talepasand’s recent show at San Francisco’s Guerrero Gallery, Made in Iran, Born in America, the use of drugs in her work, and her love of Iran. The artist says, “Take your definition of ‘Orientalism’, which I find offensive, and see if you can create art that is as conceptually profound and technically[…..]

Sophie Calle: Here Lie the Secrets of the Visitors of Green-Wood Cemetery

Sophie Calle, Here Lie the Secrets of Visitors of Green-Wood Cemetery, 2017. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery & Perrotin. Photo: Guillaume Ziccarelli.

The historic Green-Wood Cemetery is a sprawling, verdant oasis occupying 487 acres of northwest Brooklyn. For centuries, the site has been a sanctuary for mourners as well as a destination for day-trippers—sightseers, birdwatchers, and picnickers who meander landscaped paths and take selfies under blossoming trees. On April 29, 2017, a new memorial was erected on the summit of Grove Hill: a marble obelisk inscribed with the epitaph, “Here[…..]

Fan Mail: Molly Dierks

Molly Dierks. Hardbodies, 2012; wood, automotive paint, lathed aluminum, mirrors; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

In her work, Molly Dierks forces together concepts of normative femininity and elements of industrial fabrication—sometimes uneasily, other times uncannily well. Using saturated and pastel hues typically associated with women’s products in combination with hard metals and unyielding forms, Dierks makes associations between femininity and fabrication that describe complicity rather than contrasts. Her sculptures do more than point out the labor intrinsic to the production[…..]

Edward Krasiński: Two Retrospectives

Edward Krasiński’s studio, Warsaw. Courtesy of Paulina Krasinska and Foksal Gallery Foundation. Photo: Konrad Pustola.

László Beke’s essay in a 1999 exhibition catalog, Global Conceptualism: Points of Origin, 1950s–1980s, synthesizes broad Eastern and Central European conceptualist practices. Within the text, the Polish artist Edward Krasiński is mentioned only briefly in parenthesis as a “peculiar” artist.[1] This alone indicates Krasiński’s outlier status and exceptionality with regard to Eastern Bloc conceptualism. While Krasiński’s practice is clearly influenced by Minimalism’s phenomenological attention to[…..]