Sculpture

Made in Iran, Born in America

Taravat Talepasand. Iran, Iran, Iran, Iran (detail); 2017. Metal, rope, denim, pigment, hand match patches, assorted pins, iPhone 7 plus. Collaboration with Laura Rokas.

Today, from our friends at REORIENT, we bring you Joobin Bekhrad’s interview with artist Taravat Talepasand, aka TVAT. They discuss Talepasand’s recent show at San Francisco’s Guerrero Gallery, Made in Iran, Born in America, the use of drugs in her work, and her love of Iran. The artist says, “Take your definition of ‘Orientalism’, which I find offensive, and see if you can create art that is as conceptually profound and technically[…..]

Sophie Calle: Here Lie the Secrets of the Visitors of Green-Wood Cemetery

Sophie Calle, Here Lie the Secrets of Visitors of Green-Wood Cemetery, 2017. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery & Perrotin. Photo: Guillaume Ziccarelli.

The historic Green-Wood Cemetery is a sprawling, verdant oasis occupying 487 acres of northwest Brooklyn. For centuries, the site has been a sanctuary for mourners as well as a destination for day-trippers—sightseers, birdwatchers, and picnickers who meander landscaped paths and take selfies under blossoming trees. On April 29, 2017, a new memorial was erected on the summit of Grove Hill: a marble obelisk inscribed with the epitaph, “Here[…..]

Fan Mail: Molly Dierks

Molly Dierks. Hardbodies, 2012; wood, automotive paint, lathed aluminum, mirrors; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

In her work, Molly Dierks forces together concepts of normative femininity and elements of industrial fabrication—sometimes uneasily, other times uncannily well. Using saturated and pastel hues typically associated with women’s products in combination with hard metals and unyielding forms, Dierks makes associations between femininity and fabrication that describe complicity rather than contrasts. Her sculptures do more than point out the labor intrinsic to the production[…..]

Edward Krasiński: Two Retrospectives

Edward Krasiński’s studio, Warsaw. Courtesy of Paulina Krasinska and Foksal Gallery Foundation. Photo: Konrad Pustola.

László Beke’s essay in a 1999 exhibition catalog, Global Conceptualism: Points of Origin, 1950s–1980s, synthesizes broad Eastern and Central European conceptualist practices. Within the text, the Polish artist Edward Krasiński is mentioned only briefly in parenthesis as a “peculiar” artist.[1] This alone indicates Krasiński’s outlier status and exceptionality with regard to Eastern Bloc conceptualism. While Krasiński’s practice is clearly influenced by Minimalism’s phenomenological attention to[…..]

Third Space: Shifting Conversations About Contemporary Art at the Birmingham Museum of Art

José Bedia. Mpangui jimagua (Twin Brothers), 2000; acrylic and conté on canvas with objects; 122 x 355 x 188 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and the Birmingham Museum of Art.

As university presidents, corporate CEOs, and political leaders on the left and right toss the terms “multiculturalism” and “postcolonial” around in speeches and promotional materials, I am reminded that these buzzwords of the new transnational order have resisted domestication and dilution through the sharp, thoughtful, uncomplacent writing of Homi K. Bhabha.[1] Bhabha’s recognition that cultures must be understood as complex intersections of multiple places, historical[…..]

Objeto Móvil Recomendado a las Familias at Espacio de Arte de Fundación OSDE

Installation view with artworks by Orlando Pierri, Zdravko Dučmelić, Mildred Burton, and Tobías Dirty. Courtesy of Fundación OSDE. Photo: Tania Puente.

Is it still important to talk critically about Surrealism today? This avant-garde episode of international art history has been revisited over and over again, from tributes and revivals to critical works and retrospective exhibitions. From a purist, restricted view, Surrealism is reduced to a datable European movement that ended in the mid-20th century. For others, the term is a tradable currency, a flexible category used[…..]

Cecilia Vicuña: About to Happen at Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans

Cecilia Vicuña. Precarios, 1966-2017; site-specific installation of 117 found object sculptures (stone shells, glass, wood, plastic, debris). Courtesy of the Artist and the Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans. Photo: Alex Marks

For the Chilean-born visual artist, poet, and filmmaker Cecilia Vicuña, the textual and the visual exist and function together in a familial relation, as if the making of objects and the shaping of words into images are knotted together like threads, binding and weaving themselves to form reified constellations that speak of the individual and collective simultaneously.[1] Vicuña’s work has a rich engagement with the[…..]