Photography

The Conjured Life: The Legacy of Surrealism at the Cantor Arts Center

Gertrude Abercrombie. The Courtship, 1949; oil on Masonite; 21 3/4 × 25 1/4 in. Courtesy of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.

All publicity concerning The Conjured Life: The Legacy of Surrealism at Stanford University’s Cantor Art Center features The Courtship (1949) by Gertrude Abercrombie, one of six artists from the Chicago-Milwaukee-Madison parasurrealist group of the ’40s. I saw this painting once in LACMA’s all-women show of Surrealists, In Wonderland (2012), and looked forward to our reunion some five years and 361 miles hence. The inclusion of a[…..]

From Generation to Generation: Inherited Memory and Contemporary Art at the Contemporary Jewish Museum

From Generation to Generation: Inherited Memory and Contemporary Art, 2016; installation view, San Francisco, CA. Courtesy of the Contemporary Jewish Museum. Photo: JKA Photography.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Carlos Kong reviews From Generation to Generation: Inherited Memory and Contemporary Art at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco. Memories take[…..]

This Is Not Iranian

Anahita Razmi. Middle East Coast West Coast, 2014 (video still); HD Video; 23:04.

From our friends at REORIENT, today we bring you Joobin Bekhrad’s conversation with artist Anahita Razmi. Bekhrad and Razmi discuss identity, underwear, and the Pakyan. Razmi states, “I like the idea than an identity is something that one constructs, something that is at all times flexible and changing.” This article was originally published January 3, 2017. What was I doing near Trafalgar Square? I don’t know.[…..]

Breaking News: Turning the Lens on Mass Media at the Getty Center

Catherine Opie. Terry Schiavo and Pope John Paul from the series Close to Home, 2004–2005; dye diffusion prints; 15 1/2 x 14 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

Journalism is experiencing a crisis of confidence as of late, with long-running mainstream sources being labeled “fake news,” while extremist propaganda mills are hailed as harbingers of the truth. Although this specific quandary may be unprecedented, the concept that the news should be viewed with a healthy skepticism—considering from where and whom it comes—is nothing new. People living under regimes that lack a free press[…..]

Curating in an Era of Change: In Conversation With E. Jane

E. Jane. Notes on softness, 2016, NewHive site.

Today from our friends at ARTS.BLACK we bring you the third installment of author Ashley Stull Meyers’ series Curating in an Era of Change.  In this iteration of the work, Meyers interviews conceptual artist E. Jane. They discuss the internet as exhibition space, academia, and navigating the art world—and the world at large—as Black women. E. Jane states, “I think the social media feed has some Utopian possibility[…..]

Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now at SFMOMA

Tsunehisa Kimura, Americanism, 1982; photomontage; 15 1/4 x 19 1/4 in. (38.74 x 48.9 cm); promised gift of a private collection to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; © Estate of Tsunehisa Kimura

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Max Blue assesses Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now at SFMOMA. When viewing any retrospective of work, patterns emerge. Visiting Japanese Photography from[…..]

An Atlas of Mirrors: Singapore Biennale 2016

Titarubi. History Repeats Itself, 2016; Gold-plated nutmeg, copper-plated wood, nickel-plated wood, burnt wood, sampan, wood, aluminium, copper, soil, light and nutmeg perfume; Dimensions variable. Image courtesy of Singapore Art Museum.

There is no shortage of mirrors and maps in the fifth iteration of the Singapore Biennale. Glass mirrors in Harumi Yukutake’s Paracosmos (2016) curve around the main circular stairwell of the Singapore Art Museum, dazzling the eye as light hits their multiple reflective surfaces. Dozens of mirrors appear in their reflections; dozens more yet, to the power of infinity, show up in the reflections of their reflections. In[…..]