Photography

Southern Accent: Seeking the American South in Contemporary Art

Barkley L. Hendricks. Down Home Taste, 1971; oil and linen on acrylic; 48 x 48 in. Courtesy of the Artist and the Office of the Dean of Students, Cornell University (Ithaca, NY).

In her 1960 essay “Some Aspects of the Grotesque in Southern Fiction,” writer Flannery O’Connor states, “Anything that comes out of the South is going to be called grotesque by the northern reader, unless it is grotesque, in which case it is going to be called realistic.”[1] Aware of the deeply moralizing labels and qualifiers imposed upon her work and career-long subject of the South,[…..]

M/D: Coda at SFMOMA

Mickalene Thomas, Sista Sista Lady Blue, 2007; chromogenic print; 40 3/8 x 48 1/2 in. (102.55 x 123.19 cm); Collection SFMOMA, gift of Campari USA; © Mickalene Thomas / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; photo: Katherine Du Tiel

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Carolina Magis Weinberg reviews M/D: Coda at SFMOMA in San Francisco. In the current political moment, in which women and people of[…..]

Richard Mosse: Incoming at the Barbican

Richard Mosse in collaboration with Trevor Tweeten and Ben Frost. Incoming, 2017; Installation view. The Curve, Barbican Centre, 15 Feb - 23 April 2017. Photo: Tristan Fewings / Getty images

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Eva Mak reviews Richard Mosse: Incoming at the Barbican in London. No matter race, age, origin, or legal status, while the human[…..]

The Intersectional Self at the 8th Floor

Andrea Bowers. Throwing Bricks (Johanna Saavedra), 2016; archival pigment print, 77 1/2 x 57 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Jasa McKenzie reviews The Intersectional Self at 8th Floor Gallery. As more feminist marches, protests, and gatherings organize in the wake of the[…..]

Diane Arbus: In the Beginning at SFMOMA

Diane  Arbus. Female  impersonator  holding  long  gloves,  Hempstead,  L.I.,
1959. Courtesy  The Metropolitan  Museum  of Art. © The  Estate  of Diane  Arbus,  LLC.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Max Blue reviews Diane Arbus: In the Beginning at SFMOMA. Diane Arbus: In the Beginning is a meandering, somewhat maudlin journey through the[…..]

Meat Is Murder

Soukaina Joual. Halal, 2016; light panel; 13.7 x 13.2 in.

Today from our friends at REORIENT we bring you Zöe Hu’s article on artist Soukaina Joual. Hu says of Joual’s exploration of meat as a subject, “Meat’s link to violence is an easily made one, and it only takes the viewer another thoughtless step forward to affix the MENA region onto that relationship; but Joual avoids the obvious constellation of meat–violence–Arab world, instead tinkering with a[…..]

The Conjured Life: The Legacy of Surrealism at the Cantor Arts Center

Gertrude Abercrombie. The Courtship, 1949; oil on Masonite; 21 3/4 × 25 1/4 in. Courtesy of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.

All publicity concerning The Conjured Life: The Legacy of Surrealism at Stanford University’s Cantor Art Center features The Courtship (1949) by Gertrude Abercrombie, one of six artists from the Chicago-Milwaukee-Madison parasurrealist group of the ’40s. I saw this painting once in LACMA’s all-women show of Surrealists, In Wonderland (2012), and looked forward to our reunion some five years and 361 miles hence. The inclusion of a[…..]