Painting

The Supreme Rifts… A Measured Propinquity at Marian Goodman Gallery

Niele Toroni. Andata E Ritorno (orange), 1991; installation of four canvases, easels – imprints of No 50 brush repeated at regular distances 30 cm; 39 1/2 x 39 1/2 x 1 1/8 in (each). Courtesy  of the Artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, London. Photo: Thierry Bal.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Andreas Petrossiants reviews The Supreme Rifts… A Measured Propinquity at Marian Goodman Gallery in London. In Michael Newman’s poetic text accompanying the[…..]

The Intersectional Self at the 8th Floor

Andrea Bowers. Throwing Bricks (Johanna Saavedra), 2016; archival pigment print, 77 1/2 x 57 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Jasa McKenzie reviews The Intersectional Self at 8th Floor Gallery. As more feminist marches, protests, and gatherings organize in the wake of the[…..]

Fan Mail: Patricia Smith

Patricia Smith. Marnix Incident, 2012; ink, watercolor, collage, rubber stamps on paper; 24 ¾ x 19 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Patricia Smith’s mapping practice concretizes the ephemeral. Inverting the Situationists’ concept of psychogeography, in which the experience of a place affects a person’s psychological state or behavior, Smith’s maps reinterpret spaces with reference to specific events or feelings. The Incidents series refers to particular moments in time and space. Like any attempt at describing sensation or memory, the results shift and undulate, making room for[…..]

Help Desk: No Such Thing as a Dumb Question

Julie Mehretu. Untitled (Skybox), 1999; ink and watercolor on three overlayed vellum sheets pinned on board; 18 x 24 in.

Help Desk is where I answer your queries about making, exhibiting, finding, marketing, buying, selling–or any other activity related to contemporary art. Submit your questions anonymously here. All submissions become the property of Daily Serving. Long story short, I finished my MFA and moved back home to deal with some of my debt before I move to a bigger city with galleries and opportunities, etc. I[…..]

Fathi Hassan: Edge of Memory at Clark Atlanta University Art Museum

Fathi Hassan. Crossing, 2016; acrylic and gauze on paper; 58.25 x 74.8 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

In his 1978 text Orientalism, Edward Said states that the “subtle and persistent Eurocentric prejudice against Arab–Islamic peoples and their cultures” is not just bound by historical clashes, sociocultural differences, or geography, but a constellation of a “whole series of interests” predicated on the desire to control, manipulate, and incorporate “what is manifestly different.”[1] Under Western hegemonic power, the struggle for dominance in the Middle[…..]

Rina Banerjee: Human Likeness at Hosfelt Gallery

Rina Banerjee. Heavens no place for girls, no sand, no flowers no count of curls no irons to flatten nor straighten or curl you coiled corns, your hair would not leave you naked as girls when all but one could leave open my calls to trumpet her thoughts, stainless steel bikini and sanding wheels for girls who will not open, 2016; blue silver leaf, acrylic, aluminum leaf, and ink on paper; 66 x 30 inches. Courtesy of Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Maddie Klett reviews Rina Banerjee: Human Likeness at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco. Indian artist Rina Banerjee titles her bold paintings and[…..]

Fan Mail: Fei Li

Fei Li. The Hidden Dimension and Other Observations, installation view, 2016; ink on paper, mirrors; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

Experiencing Fei Li’s landscapes is like walking into a jungle. Her tangled calligraphy leaps and coils across the paper like vines, folding in associations with visual language; the disparate sensations of walking through dense vegetation and reading a scrawled manuscript are flattened into one experience, such that the idea that the two were ever separate seems like an abstract theory. Li’s work suggests an almost[…..]