Painting

Southern Accent: Seeking the American South in Contemporary Art

Barkley L. Hendricks. Down Home Taste, 1971; oil and linen on acrylic; 48 x 48 in. Courtesy of the Artist and the Office of the Dean of Students, Cornell University (Ithaca, NY).

In her 1960 essay “Some Aspects of the Grotesque in Southern Fiction,” writer Flannery O’Connor states, “Anything that comes out of the South is going to be called grotesque by the northern reader, unless it is grotesque, in which case it is going to be called realistic.”[1] Aware of the deeply moralizing labels and qualifiers imposed upon her work and career-long subject of the South,[…..]

M/D: Coda at SFMOMA

Mickalene Thomas, Sista Sista Lady Blue, 2007; chromogenic print; 40 3/8 x 48 1/2 in. (102.55 x 123.19 cm); Collection SFMOMA, gift of Campari USA; © Mickalene Thomas / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; photo: Katherine Du Tiel

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Carolina Magis Weinberg reviews M/D: Coda at SFMOMA in San Francisco. In the current political moment, in which women and people of[…..]

Dennis Jeffy: From Antelope Springs at MOCA Tucson

Dennis Jeffy. Dooli Sings, 2000; oil on canvas; 80 in. diameter. Courtesy of the Artist and MOCA Tucson. Photo: Maya Heilman-Hall

In an age when internet presence grants visibility, the sparsity of digital images and articles of Dennis Jeffy’s work makes his solo exhibition, From Antelope Springs, at MOCA Tucson a significant and rare occurrence to be experienced. Born in Antelope Springs (Navajo for Jeddito, Arizona) in 1952, Jeffy has developed a fertile artistic practice that has journeyed through a wide range of experimentation in style, material,[…..]

Third Space: Shifting Conversations About Contemporary Art at the Birmingham Museum of Art

José Bedia. Mpangui jimagua (Twin Brothers), 2000; acrylic and conté on canvas with objects; 122 x 355 x 188 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and the Birmingham Museum of Art.

As university presidents, corporate CEOs, and political leaders on the left and right toss the terms “multiculturalism” and “postcolonial” around in speeches and promotional materials, I am reminded that these buzzwords of the new transnational order have resisted domestication and dilution through the sharp, thoughtful, uncomplacent writing of Homi K. Bhabha.[1] Bhabha’s recognition that cultures must be understood as complex intersections of multiple places, historical[…..]

Cynthia Daignault: The Pure Products of America Go Crazy at CAPITAL

Cynthia Daignault. 
Matrix, 2017 (detail); oil on linen; 11 x 12 in. Courtesy of the Artist and CAPITAL.

Cynthia Daignault is always confounding our ideas about the nature of painting—and asks if it has an essential nature at all. In her latest show, The Pure Products of America Go Crazy, at CAPITAL in San Francisco (a sort of return home for a prodigal daughter educated at Stanford), she has done it again. Daignault has placed seventy oil-on-linen paintings like dinner plates on six[…..]

Objeto Móvil Recomendado a las Familias at Espacio de Arte de Fundación OSDE

Installation view with artworks by Orlando Pierri, Zdravko Dučmelić, Mildred Burton, and Tobías Dirty. Courtesy of Fundación OSDE. Photo: Tania Puente.

Is it still important to talk critically about Surrealism today? This avant-garde episode of international art history has been revisited over and over again, from tributes and revivals to critical works and retrospective exhibitions. From a purist, restricted view, Surrealism is reduced to a datable European movement that ended in the mid-20th century. For others, the term is a tradable currency, a flexible category used[…..]

Raymond Pettibon: A Pen of All Work at New Museum

Raymond Pettibon: A Pen of All Work, 2017. New Museum, New York. Photo: Maris Hutchinson / EPW Studio

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Lux Yuting Bai reviews Raymond Pettibon: A Pen of All Work at New Museum in New York. Presenting approximately 800 drawings from[…..]