Interviews

Spotlight: ARTS.BLACK

HouseFull at Regina’s Door, “We Are Staying Right Here,” Photo: Robbie Sweeny Photography

This summer, Daily Serving is shining a light on some of the many arts publications that we respect, and this week we’re devoting our attention to ARTS.BLACK. “Loud.Black.Resident III” is the first selection from co-editors Taylor Renee and Jessica Lynne: “In 2016, we commissioned our first interview series focused on performance from Arielle Julia Brown, theater artist and performance curator. This conversation with Amara Tabor Smith invokes the[…..]

Spotlight: Chicago Artist Writers

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Continuing our week highlighting the work of Chicago Artist Writers, today we bring you an extensive interview with artist and author David Robbins. In his books High Entertainment (2009) and Concrete Comedy: An Alternative History of Twentieth-Century Comedy (2011), Robbins reimagines the role of the artist in pop culture. In this conversation with Dan Gunn, Robbins focuses on President Trump’s rhetoric, capitalism, professional wrestling, Andy Kaufman,[…..]

Spotlight: Chicago Artist Writers

William Dawson. Collected Figures, c. 1970.

This summer, Daily Serving is shining a light on some arts publications that we regularly read and love, and this week we’re focusing our attention on the work of Chicago Artist Writers. In this interview with Dan Gunn, artist and curator Faheem Majeed discusses his exhibition Post Black Folk Art in America 1930–1980–2016, a reflection on the Corcoran Gallery of Art’s groundbreaking 1982 exhibition Black Folk Art in America 1930–1980. Majeed[…..]

Odd Jobs: Neha Choksi

Neha Choksi. The Sun’s Rehearsal, 2016; performance still and installation view (2016) at Carriageworks for the 20th Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy of the artist and Project 88, Mumbai. Photo: Neha Choksi.

Welcome back to Odd Jobs, an exploration of artists’ varied and untraditional career arcs. For this edition, I spoke with Neha Choksi in the Otis College of Art and Design cafeteria. Choksi was born in 1973 in Belleville, New Jersey, raised in Bombay, and currently lives and works in Los Angeles and Bombay. She employs sculpture, video, photography, sound, painting, and performance in her work,[…..]

From the Archives – Interview with Shanti Grumbine

Shanti Grumbine. Persephone, April 2, 2013, A1, 2015; basswood dowels, anodized die, pigment print, mirrors, wood panel, 22 x 29 in.

In a world of propaganda and fake news, sorting fact from fiction can be a complicated task. Today we revisit Ashley Stull Meyers’ interview with artist Shanti Grumbine, who deconstructs newspapers as a way of investigating the power dynamics of communication. “The goal of journalism is to discover and present an objective truth—which is an impossible task.” This article was originally published on March 9, 2015. Art[…..]

Odd Jobs: Lenka Clayton

Lenka Clayton. Sculpture For The Blind, By The Blind, 2017; plaster, linen, wood, Braille sign, mounted digital photograph, portfolio of photographs. Courtesy of the artist. Photos: Carlos Avendano

Welcome back to Odd Jobs, where I interview artists about their varied and non-traditional career arcs. For this installment I spoke with Lenka Clayton, whose works include hand-numbering 7,000 stones, searching for all 613 people mentioned in a single edition of a German newspaper, and reconstituting a lost museum from a sketch on the back of an envelope. Her practice exaggerates and alters the accepted rules of[…..]

Talking About 100 Days Action, Part 2

Ricki Dwyer. Shred and Re-weave the American Flag, 2017; participatory action, performed on January 27, 2017, at Open Windows Cooperative in San Francisco, as part of 100 Days Action. Courtesy of the Artist.

April 30 is the last of Donald Trump’s first 100 days in office. To mark that inauspicious event, I spoke with Kenneth Lo, artist and social media manager for 100 Days Action, and artist Ricki Dwyer, who contributed the intervention Shred and Re-weave the American Flag. Our discussion ranged from how resistance efforts have changed since the inauguration, to the role artist–activists play in those efforts[…..]