Sarah Margolis-Pineo

From this Author

Sophie Calle: Here Lie the Secrets of the Visitors of Green-Wood Cemetery

Sophie Calle, Here Lie the Secrets of Visitors of Green-Wood Cemetery, 2017. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery & Perrotin. Photo: Guillaume Ziccarelli.

The historic Green-Wood Cemetery is a sprawling, verdant oasis occupying 487 acres of northwest Brooklyn. For centuries, the site has been a sanctuary for mourners as well as a destination for day-trippers—sightseers, birdwatchers, and picnickers who meander landscaped paths and take selfies under blossoming trees. On April 29, 2017, a new memorial was erected on the summit of Grove Hill: a marble obelisk inscribed with the epitaph, “Here[…..]

Pedro Reyes: Doomocracy at the Brooklyn Army Terminal

Pedro Reyes. Lady Liberty, 2016; installation view, Pedro Reyes: Doomocracy, 2016. Courtesy of Creative Time, New York. Photo: Will Star Shooting Stars Pro

The word “doom” is frequently preceded by “impending” or “certain.” It implies finality—condemnation to a state of catastrophic ruin that overpowers any attempt to forge order and peace. In the case of Doomocracy, an immersive installation and performance in the form of a house of political horrors conceived by Mexico City–based artist Pedro Reyes, doom is employed as part parable and part prophesy—a way to[…..]

Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic at Seattle Art Museum

Kehinde Wiley. Mrs. Waldorf Astor, 2012; oil on linen; 72 x 60 inches. © Kehinde Wiley.

A New Republic at Seattle Art Museum is Kehinde Wiley’s second solo exhibition organized by the Brooklyn Museum. In his brief fifteen-year career, Wiley has quickly become an established cultural trope. His works have adorned the set of Empire and served as icons of the FIFA World Cup. His portraits of Black men and women are at once celebrated as a vision of Black empowerment[…..]

Salt/Water at the Photographic Center Northwest

Daniel Hawkins. Union Bay #5, 2013; C-print; 8 x 10 inches. Courtesy of the Artist.

Salt and water: an amalgamation of fundamental, life-sustaining compounds that evokes the sea, sweaty human excretions, and the makings of primordial soup. Independently innocuous, it is the combination of salt and water that produces something transformative—a substance potentially electric and corrosive. It is the coming together of salt and water that sparked the concept for Salt/Water, an exhibition of contemporary photography on view at the[…..]

Franz Erhard Walther and Pae White at the Henry Art Gallery

Franz Erhard Walther. Sehkanal (with body weight and exertion exposing one's opposite number to one's gaze - sight channel) Single Element n°46 of 1.Werksatz, 1968. Green fabric: 30 x 740 x 20 cm. Courtesy of Galerie Jocelyn Wolff. Photo credit: Timm Rautert. Copyright Franz Erhard Walther Foundation, Timm Rautert.

The Henry Art Gallery in Seattle opens two exhibitions, Franz Erhard Walther: The Body Draws and Pae White: Command-Shift-4. The featured artists—albeit separated by 24 years and 5,600 miles—create a compelling juxtaposition, revealing shared interests in graphic art, architecture, and fiber as mediums that shift between sculpture and performance. Both artists produce works that are liminal and in flux—forever making and remaking themselves through direct interaction.[…..]

Genius/21 Century/Seattle at the Frye Art Museum

Lead Pencil Studio (Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo). Under the Surface, 2008; charcoal graphite and paint on paper; 71 x 58 in. Courtesy of the Artists.

For the last thirteen years, Seattle has cheekily retorted the MacArthur Foundation’s annual announcement of “Genius Grant” winners by presenting a roster of its own local “geniuses” through the Stranger Genius Award. The Stranger, which is the city’s weekly alternative news and entertainment paper, selects and awards five individuals each year, from the fields of art, performance, literature, film, and music, with $5,000 of unrestricted[…..]

Disguise: Masks & Global African Art at Seattle Art Museum

Brendan Fernandes. As One, 2015; HD video loop; 22:54 minutes. Courtesy of the artist.

Museums are constantly devising new platforms to present their permanent collections. Interventions and mining-the-museum have become commonplace curatorial strategies, and institutions frequently turn to contemporary artists to animate, recontextualize, and bring visibility to canonized cultural objects. Disguise: Masks and Global African Art is Seattle Art Museum’s latest attempt to draw connections across temporal, geographic, and cultural lines. Leveraging the museum’s collection of African masks, the[…..]