Mailee Hung

From this Author

Fan Mail: Kristin Cammermeyer

Kristin Cammermeyer. Accumulation at 12th & Marion, 2015 (detail); site-specific mixed-media installation produced for stop-motion video at Hedreen Gallery, Seattle University; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

Kristin Cammermeyer’s works are tributes to becoming. They render a sense that completion is an arbitrary concept, that anything that ends has more to do with one’s perspective than its inherent finitude. Her installations are constantly in flux, resulting either from her construction and deconstruction of the spaces they inhabit or from the multimedia videos that become both artifacts of the physical pieces and digital[…..]

Fan Mail: Lionel Cruet

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Lionel Cruet is preoccupied by the idea of place. Much of his work explores how one can attempt to access the places in which one is not physically present, and questions if these attempts can ever be successful. Of particular concern to Cruet is how race and geopolitical status factor into these attempts—how one’s described and prescribed identities render access to, and denial from, a[…..]

Fan Mail: Molly Dierks

Molly Dierks. Hardbodies, 2012; wood, automotive paint, lathed aluminum, mirrors; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

In her work, Molly Dierks forces together concepts of normative femininity and elements of industrial fabrication—sometimes uneasily, other times uncannily well. Using saturated and pastel hues typically associated with women’s products in combination with hard metals and unyielding forms, Dierks makes associations between femininity and fabrication that describe complicity rather than contrasts. Her sculptures do more than point out the labor intrinsic to the production[…..]

Fan Mail: Patricia Smith

Patricia Smith. Marnix Incident, 2012; ink, watercolor, collage, rubber stamps on paper; 24 ¾ x 19 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Patricia Smith’s mapping practice concretizes the ephemeral. Inverting the Situationists’ concept of psychogeography, in which the experience of a place affects a person’s psychological state or behavior, Smith’s maps reinterpret spaces with reference to specific events or feelings. The Incidents series refers to particular moments in time and space. Like any attempt at describing sensation or memory, the results shift and undulate, making room for[…..]

Fan Mail: Brian Cooper

Brian Cooper. Gratification Management, 2004 (detail); upholstery, synthetic stuffing, staples, zip ties, chicken wire, covered buttons, metal buckets, carpet, wood paneling; 15 x 30 x 2 feet. Courtesy of the Artist.

There is something quite sordid about Brian Cooper’s sculptural installations. The tufted forms in sickly mustard yellows and dark browns seem to ooze over walls, drip down plinths, and pool on aging carpets. As heavy, spreading masses and playful renditions on the theme of corporeality, they are like tactile manifestations of the slow, creeping wave of nausea that comes when one has overstayed an afterparty.[…..]

Fan Mail: Fei Li

Fei Li. The Hidden Dimension and Other Observations, installation view, 2016; ink on paper, mirrors; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

Experiencing Fei Li’s landscapes is like walking into a jungle. Her tangled calligraphy leaps and coils across the paper like vines, folding in associations with visual language; the disparate sensations of walking through dense vegetation and reading a scrawled manuscript are flattened into one experience, such that the idea that the two were ever separate seems like an abstract theory. Li’s work suggests an almost[…..]

Fan Mail: Ludovic Duchâteau

Ludovic Duchâteau. Dynamic Confirmation, 2016 (installation view); plastic, epoxy, clay, latex, copper, steel, acrylic; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

Ludovic Duchâteau’s work presents visions of ambivalent technologies, uncannily inert and uncertain in their impotence. His objects are often scattered and sprawled along gallery floors or empty streets as if discarded or depleted. Their forms resemble our technological objects and fantasies, and imagery from science fiction. They look almost like crashed alien probes or satellites, disconnected from their users or power sources, vaguely threatening in[…..]