Genevieve Quick

From this Author

Latin American Circle Presents: An Evening of Performances

Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa. A Brief History of Architecture in Guatemala (Breve Historia de la Arquitec-tura en Guatemala), 2010; performance. Courtesy of the Guggenheim. Photos: Enid Alvarez © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 2017.

Fifty years ago, in conversations with Robert Smithson, Allan Kaprow referred to museums as mausoleums, and proposed the Guggenheim be emptied of all of its contents and presented as a sculptural form. [1] Today, we still struggle with bringing life into museums. In particular, performance work can be conceptually fraught in the museum when artists have circumvented the commodification and rarefaction of art by creating ephemeral works[…..]

Dread Scott: Past, Present & Future at Guerrero Gallery

Dread Scott. A Man Was Lynched by Police Yesterday, 2015; embroidered nylon; 84 x 52.5 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Guerrero Gallery, San Francisco.

Dread Scott has a long history of creating provocative works that address the hypocrisies and injustices within the United States. Unfortunately, his extremely sparse solo exhibition, Past, Present & Future at Guerrero Gallery, underwhelms. Spread between the main gallery and the project space, the show presents three very commanding works that span a thirteen-year period. Scott’s exhibition feels like a local display of highly publicized[…..]

Generation to Generation: Inherited Memory and Contemporary Art

Nao Bustamante. Kevlar Fighting Costumes, 2015; protective Kevlar® wearable fighting costumes (set of 5), Dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Dale Griner.

From Generation to Generation: Inherited Memory and Contemporary Art at the Contemporary Jewish Museum explores Marianne Hirsch’s work on “postmemory,” which posits that even without direct experience, we identify so strongly with some historic events and ancestral stories that we take them as our own. Hirsch’s work and the exhibition examine the role of imagination within memory and the way that it shapes contemporary identity.[…..]

Sophia Al-Maria: Black Friday at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Sophia Al-Maria. Black Friday (still), 2016; digital video projected vertically, color, sound; 16:36. Collection of the Artist. Courtesy of Anna Lena Films, Paris, and The Third Line, Dubai.

In George Romero’s Dawn of the Dead (1978), a character posits that the zombies are flocking to the mall because of “[s]ome kind of instinct. Memory. It’s what they used to do. This is an important place in their lives.” As Romero’s zombies siege the mall, the filmmaker critiques consumerism and how it has penetrated the human condition. The mall acts as a refuge, housing[…..]

Setting Out at Apexart

William Lamson. A Line Describing the Sun, 2010 (video still); 2-channel video; 13:35. Courtesy of the Artist and apexart, New York.

In Setting Out (an exhibition selected as part of apexart’s Unsolicited Proposal Program), the guest curators Shona Kitchen, Aly Ogasian, and Jennifer Dalton Vincent showcase works that reframe or enact the vocabularies, tools, and approaches of explorers and scientists. With many intriguing works on display, the most interesting render the Earth strange by observing it with fresh eyes, analogous to the wonder of seeing distant[…..]

Wael Shawky: Cabaret Crusades at MoMA PS1

Wael Shawky. Wael Shawky: Cabaret Crusades, 2015; installation view, MoMA PS1, New York, featuring marionettes from Cabaret Crusades: The Secrets of Karbala, 2015. Courtesy of MoMA PS1, New York, and Sfeir Semler Gallery, Beirut and Hamburg.

Wael Shawky’s gorgeous cinematography, sets, and marionettes fuse a child-like play with the horrors and complications of war and history.

Ragnar Kjartansson: The End at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit

Ragnar Kjartansson. The End, 2009; Video. Courtesy of MOCAD, the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8 Gallery, Reykjavik.

The Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD) presents Ragnar Kjartansson’s gorgeous and shrewd video installation The End (2009). On five rear projection screens, Kjartansson and his collaborator, Icelandic musician Davíð Þór Jónsson, play all of the parts of an unidentified country-music song on piano, banjo, drums, and acoustic and electric guitars. Shot in the Rocky Mountains in Canada, both men are bearded and dressed in[…..]