Ashley Stull Meyers

From this Author

Interview with Hank Willis Thomas

Hank Willis Thomas. Question Bridge, 2013 at the Missouri History Museum.

Hank Willis Thomas has long illuminated the histories of racialized labor, Black cultural economies, politically crafted imagery, and their cumulative roads to revolution. His keen examinations of political gesture are steadily outgrowing their categorization as visual art and becoming increasingly discursive projects rooted in actualization. On the heels of his recent exhibition at Savannah College of Art and Design, Willis Thomas offers new avenues for[…..]

Interview with Wendy Red Star

Beatrice Red Star Fletcher and Wendy Red Star​. Apsáalooke Feminist #3, 2016. Press image. Courtesy of the Artist.​

Wendy Red Star produces photographs, textile-based works, and performances that situate her womanhood and Crow heritage as ontologically intertwined. Collaborating with fellow Indigenous artists, performers of other disciplines, and her daughter, Red Star documents her various achievements in the contemporary art world through strategies that have historical ties. Ashley Stull Meyers: You have roots in Montana and Colorado. What influenced you to settle in Portland, Oregon,[…..]

Interview with Katherine Bradford

Katherine Bradford. Water Nurses, 2016; acrylic on canvas. Courtesy the artist and Adams and Ollman. Photo: Christine Taylor

Artist Katherine Bradford likes acrylic paint. As a material, acrylic is filled with wonder for its contradictions. Its water-soluble chemistry allows for the kind of dreamy washes that color fields and abstractions often rely on, while its water-resistant setting state is anchored and dependable. Bradford’s solo exhibition Divers and Dreamers, currently on view at Adams and Ollman, is up to the comparison of being dually[…..]

Amir H. Fallah: All Experience Is an Arch at Hap Gallery

Students of metaphysics commonly debate about time and space as an arc—curving and perhaps boomeranging, to ends that are difficult to articulate. Los Angeles–based artist Amir H. Fallah, however, postulates the experience of time and space as something more solid and tangible, akin to a structure engineered for indiscriminate movement back and forth. All Experience Is an Arch at Hap Gallery is an experiential recounting[…..]

The Lasting Concept at Portland Institute for Contemporary Art

Sara Greenberger Rafferty. Testing VIII, 2016 (detail); microphone stand and asparagus, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and (gallery). Photo: Evan La Londe/WORKSIGHTED

The Lasting Concept at Portland Institute for Contemporary Art (PICA) is, by design, chronically unsure of its form. Initially conceptualized as a publication of the same name, the exhibition explores the nagging, process-driven revelation of being unable to excise a particular understanding from one’s thinking. With content that requires a method of digestion similar to reading, the exhibition’s connection to experimental publishing is evident. It’s[…..]

Mike Bray: Light Grammar/Grammar Light at Fourteen30 Contemporary

Mike Bray. ​The Necessity to Interfere with Movement​, 2016; light stands, ​acrylic, neon;​ 60​ x ​78​ x ​6​ inches. Courtesy of the Artist and Fourteen30 Contemporary.

The mechanics of grammar are the starter set of must-know rules for uniform speaking. They are the basic regulations without which language can be rendered clumsy beyond comprehension. Artist Mike Bray engages with these mechanics through his video, photographic, and sculptural works. At first concerned with the logistics of light and form on a fundamental level, Bray’s works expand to make visible their potential through[…..]

Leif Anderson: TATTARRATTAT at Melanie Flood Projects

Leif Anderson. Purple Slurry, 2015; installation view, TATTARRATTAT, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Melanie Flood Projects. Photo: Worksighted.

The word “Tattarrattat” was first birthed in James Joyce’s 1922 novel, Ulysses. It’s the longest palindromic word in English literature and an unmistakable onomatopoeia that takes inalienable form only in a moment we can collectively imagine: a furious rapping at the door. Such phrases within Joyce’s Ulysses and Finnegans Wake make him a legend amongst Modernist writers who are trepidatious about inventing words where none[…..]